Russia at War: From the Mongol Conquest to Afghanistan, Chechnya, and Beyond [2 volumes]

ABC-CLIO
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Russian military history is an often-overlooked field. Yet Russia is and has long been an important player in global politics, and its military exploits have been central to its role on the world stage. This study of Russia's military past provides insights into European and U.S. history, including the conduct of the two World Wars and the Cold War, and will help readers better appreciate the current geopolitical situation.

This work covers major events and figures in Russian military history from the end of Mongol domination in the 14th century to the present day. More than 650 entries by scores of expert contributors detail events, individuals, organizations, and ideas that have influenced Russian warfare over 800 years. Two alphabetically arranged volumes explore such conflicts as the Russo-Polish Wars, the Great Northern War, the Russo-Turkish Wars, the Napoleonic Wars, the Crimean War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War, including the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Cross references and further readings in each entry serve as jumping-off points for further exploration.

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About the author

Timothy C. Dowling is professor of history at the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Dec 2, 2014
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Pages
1077
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ISBN
9781598849486
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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