Three Views of Logic: Mathematics, Philosophy, and Computer Science

Princeton University Press
Free sample

Demonstrating the different roles that logic plays in the disciplines of computer science, mathematics, and philosophy, this concise undergraduate textbook covers select topics from three different areas of logic: proof theory, computability theory, and nonclassical logic. The book balances accessibility, breadth, and rigor, and is designed so that its materials will fit into a single semester. Its distinctive presentation of traditional logic material will enhance readers' capabilities and mathematical maturity.

The proof theory portion presents classical propositional logic and first-order logic using a computer-oriented (resolution) formal system. Linear resolution and its connection to the programming language Prolog are also treated. The computability component offers a machine model and mathematical model for computation, proves the equivalence of the two approaches, and includes famous decision problems unsolvable by an algorithm. The section on nonclassical logic discusses the shortcomings of classical logic in its treatment of implication and an alternate approach that improves upon it: Anderson and Belnap's relevance logic. Applications are included in each section. The material on a four-valued semantics for relevance logic is presented in textbook form for the first time.


Aimed at upper-level undergraduates of moderate analytical background, Three Views of Logic will be useful in a variety of classroom settings.

  • Gives an exceptionally broad view of logic

  • Treats traditional logic in a modern format

  • Presents relevance logic with applications

  • Provides an ideal text for a variety of one-semester upper-level undergraduate courses

  • Read more
    Collapse

    About the author

    Donald W. Loveland is professor emeritus of computer science at Duke University and the author of Automated Theorem Proving: A Logical Basis. Richard E. Hodel is associate professor emeritus of mathematics at Duke University and the author of An Introduction to Mathematical Logic. S. G. Sterrett is the Curtis D. Gridley Distinguished Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at Wichita State University and the author of Wittgenstein Flies a Kite: A Story of Models of Wings and Models of the World.
    Read more
    Collapse
    Loading...

    Additional Information

    Publisher
    Princeton University Press
    Read more
    Collapse
    Published on
    Jan 26, 2014
    Read more
    Collapse
    Pages
    344
    Read more
    Collapse
    ISBN
    9781400848751
    Read more
    Collapse
    Read more
    Collapse
    Best For
    Read more
    Collapse
    Language
    English
    Read more
    Collapse
    Genres
    Computers / Computer Science
    Mathematics / History & Philosophy
    Mathematics / Linear & Nonlinear Programming
    Mathematics / Logic
    Philosophy / Logic
    Read more
    Collapse
    Content Protection
    This content is DRM protected.
    Read more
    Collapse
    Eligible for Family Library

    Reading information

    Smartphones and Tablets

    Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

    Laptops and Computers

    You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

    eReaders and other devices

    To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
    This invaluable volume ends the quest to uncover the secret recipes for predicting the long-term evolution of a ring of identical elementary cells where the binary state of each cell during each generation of an attractor (i.e. after the transients had disappeared) is determined uniquely by the state of its left and right neighbors in the previous generation, as decreed by one of 256 truth tables. As befitting the contents aimed at school children, it was found pedagogically appealing to code each truth table by coloring each of the 8 vertices of a cubical graph in red (for binary state 1), or blue (for binary state 0), forming a toy universe of 256 Boolean cubes, each bearing a different vertex color combination.The corresponding collection of 256 distinct Boolean cubes are then segegrated logically into 6 distinct groups where members from each group share certain common dynamics which allow the long-term evolution of the color configuration of each bit string, of arbitrary length, to be predicted painlessly, via a toy-like gaming procedure, without involving any calculation. In particular, the evolution of any bit string bearing any initial color configuration which resides in any one of the possibly many distinct attractors, can be systematically predicted, by school children who are yet to learn arithmetic, via a simple recipe, for any Boolean cube belonging to group 1, 2, 3, or 4. The simple recipe for predicting the time-asymptotic behaviors of Boolean cubes belonging to groups 1, 2, and 3 has been covered in Vols. I, II, ..., V.This final volume continues the recipe for each of the 108, out of 256, local rules, dubbed the Bernoulli rules, belonging to group 4. Here, for almost half of the toy universe, surprisingly simple recipes involving only the following three pieces of information are derived in Vol. VI; namely, a positive integer τ, a positive, or negative, integer σ, and a sign parameter β > 0, or β 0. In particular, given any color configuration belonging to an attractor of any one of the 108 Boolean cubes from group 4, any child can predict the color configuration after τ generations, without any computation, by merely shifting each cell σ bits to the left (resp. right) if σ 0 (resp. σ
    A semantically well-defined programming language widely used in artificial intelligence, Prolog has greatly influenced other programming languages since its introduction in the late 1970s. A user may find Prolog deceptively easy, however, and there are a number of different implementations. In this book Patrice Boizumault draws from his extensive experience in Prolog implementation to describe for students of all levels the concepts, difficulties, and design limits of a Prolog system.

    Boizumault introduces the specific problems posed by the implementation of Prolog, studies and compares different solutions--notably those of the schools of Marseilles and Edinburgh--and concludes with three examples of implementation. Major points of interest include identifying the important differences in implementing unification and resolution; presenting three features of Prolog II--infinite trees, dif, and freeze--that introduce constraints; thoroughly describing Warren's Abstract Machine (WAM); and detailing a Lisp imple-mentation of Prolog.

    Originally published in 1993.

    The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    The Freakonomics of math—a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our hands

    The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn’t confined to abstract incidents that never occur in real life, but rather touches everything we do—the whole world is shot through with it.

    Math allows us to see the hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of our world. It’s a science of not being wrong, hammered out by centuries of hard work and argument. Armed with the tools of mathematics, we can see through to the true meaning of information we take for granted: How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer?

    How Not to Be Wrong presents the surprising revelations behind all of these questions and many more, using the mathematician’s method of analyzing life and exposing the hard-won insights of the academic community to the layman—minus the jargon. Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia’s views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can’t figure out about you, and the existence of God.

    Ellenberg pulls from history as well as from the latest theoretical developments to provide those not trained in math with the knowledge they need. Math, as Ellenberg says, is “an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense, vastly multiplying its reach and strength.” With the tools of mathematics in hand, you can understand the world in a deeper, more meaningful way. How Not to Be Wrong will show you how.
    ©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
    By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.