The Making of Modern Liberalism

Princeton University Press
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The Making of Modern Liberalism is a deep and wide-ranging exploration of the origins and nature of liberalism from the Enlightenment through its triumphs and setbacks in the twentieth century and beyond. The book is the fruit of the more than four decades during which Alan Ryan, one of the world's leading political thinkers, reflected on the past of the liberal tradition—and worried about its future.

This is essential reading for anyone interested in political theory or the history of liberalism.

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About the author

Alan Ryan, the former warden of New College, Oxford, has taught political theory at Oxford and Princeton since 1969. His books include The Philosophy of John Stuart Mill, Bertrand Russell: A Political Life, John Dewey and the High Tide of American Liberalism, and Liberal Anxieties and Liberal Education.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Aug 5, 2012
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Pages
680
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ISBN
9781400841950
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Political
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Conservatism & Liberalism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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An essential, comprehensive, and accessible guide to the life and works of Aristotle. In On Aristotle: Saving Politics from Philosophy, Alan Ryan examines Plato's most famous student and sharpest critic, whose writing has helped shape over two millennia of Western philosophy, science, and religion. The first thinker to posit that a society should be ruled by laws and not men, Aristotle was born in Stagira, Macedon, in 384 BCE. He would go on to join Plato's Academy and eventually become tutor to Alexander the Great. During his lifetime he would see the revival of Athens following its destruction in the Peloponnesian War, before the ultimate extinction of its radical form of democracy after the Macedonian conquest. Aristotle’s strongly empirical cast of mind was brought to bear on a stunning range of subjects, from rhetoric to physics, from the history of political institutions and mathematics to zoology and botany. The resulting system dominated European thought from the thirteenth to seventeenth centuries.

In Nicomachean Ethics and Politics—both excerpted here—Aristotle attempted to delineate the ideal virtues of a both public and private life as well as critique the utopian antipolitics of his former teacher, Plato. For Aristotle, life in a polis was the natural state of man and provided the greatest opportunity for human beings to fulfill their potential. Unlike his scientific theories, which would eventually be displaced by Galileo, Newton, and Darwin, Aristotle’s meticulous thinking on the nature of human affairs, ethics, politics, citizenship, and virtue in a civil society remains as vital today as it was in his own time.

'As the early 21st century emerges as an era that is likely to be the most operationally demanding decade in Australian Army history since the Vietnam War of the early 1960s, I commend this excellent study to all those who seek understanding of the changing character of armed conflict.' - Lieutenant General Peter Cosgrove, AC, MC, Chief of Army

The war in Iraq has demonstrated that land warfare in the Information Age is infinitely more complex than in the past. Armed conflicts continue to break out and the international community is confronted with the threat of unrestricted warfare by terrorist groups and rogue states. Rapid change is challenging contemporary armies to keep pace with the strategic and operational demands that are being made of them.

This book analyses the impact of the information age on future land warfare. It covers issues such as urban warfare; coalition operations; the revolution in military affairs; asymmetric warfare; close combat; peacekeeping; military training and recruiting; and the challenges posed by terrorism.

Armies are being committed to a broad spectrum of land operations that range from humanitarian relief to full-scale warfare. At any stage along that continuum, soldiers can find themselves embroiled in lethal combat while trying to achieve political objectives and observing the rules of war. The expert analyses by some of the world's leading strategic thinkers on land warfare examine the operational, strategic and ethical conundrums that soldiers, their commanders and the societies they serve will have to wrestle with in the future.
An essential, comprehensive, and accessible guide to the life and works of Aristotle. In On Aristotle: Saving Politics from Philosophy, Alan Ryan examines Plato's most famous student and sharpest critic, whose writing has helped shape over two millennia of Western philosophy, science, and religion. The first thinker to posit that a society should be ruled by laws and not men, Aristotle was born in Stagira, Macedon, in 384 BCE. He would go on to join Plato's Academy and eventually become tutor to Alexander the Great. During his lifetime he would see the revival of Athens following its destruction in the Peloponnesian War, before the ultimate extinction of its radical form of democracy after the Macedonian conquest. Aristotle’s strongly empirical cast of mind was brought to bear on a stunning range of subjects, from rhetoric to physics, from the history of political institutions and mathematics to zoology and botany. The resulting system dominated European thought from the thirteenth to seventeenth centuries.

In Nicomachean Ethics and Politics—both excerpted here—Aristotle attempted to delineate the ideal virtues of a both public and private life as well as critique the utopian antipolitics of his former teacher, Plato. For Aristotle, life in a polis was the natural state of man and provided the greatest opportunity for human beings to fulfill their potential. Unlike his scientific theories, which would eventually be displaced by Galileo, Newton, and Darwin, Aristotle’s meticulous thinking on the nature of human affairs, ethics, politics, citizenship, and virtue in a civil society remains as vital today as it was in his own time.

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