Haerenga

BWB Texts

Book 29
Bridget Williams Books
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Māori and Europeans were encountering one another for the first time not just along the shorelines of New Zealand but also on the streets of Melbourne, Liverpool and New York.

From the late eighteenth century, Māori travellers spread out from New Zealand across the globe. They travelled for a variety of reasons – curiosity, adventure, commerce, political missions or duress – and were part of an international movement of Māori of surprisingly large scale. Most travellers eventually returned home, bringing something of their own ‘new world’ experiences with them. These remarkable experiences of voyaging and discovery, presented across a series of vignettes, also form part of the wider history of Māori and Pākehā encounter.
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About the author

Vincent O’Malley is a founding partner of HistoryWorks, a Wellington consultancy specialising inTreaty of Waitangi research, and is the author of a number of books on New Zealand history including The Meeting Place: Māori and Pākehā Encounters, 1642–1840 (Auckland University Press, 2012), which was shortlisted in the general non-fiction section at the New Zealand Post Book Awards in 2013, and Beyond the Imperial Frontier: The Contest for Colonial New Zealand (Bridget Williams Books, 2014).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
May 4, 2015
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9780908321193
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Australia & New Zealand
History / Modern / 19th Century
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This content is DRM protected.
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During the past thirty years the human history of the Australian continent has become the object of intense national and international interest. These years have been the 'decades of discovery', featuring fieldwork and analyses which have rewritten the distant past of Australia almost on a yearly basis. One measure of the international significance of these discoveries is the listing of three great archaeological provinces (Kakadu, Lake Mungo, and South West Tasmania) on the World Heritage Register.

The Archaeology of Aboriginal Australia seeks to convey a sense of the excitement and significance of the research undertaken during the 'decades of discovery'. The material presented here--specially commissioned essays and key published articles by new and established scholars--focuses on the themes and issues which continue to attract the most attention among archaeologists:

* the antiquity of the human settlement of Australia

* patterns of colonisation

* the significance of change in Aboriginal society in the late prehistoric period

* the usefulness of reconstructions of past ecological systems in understanding the

histories of Aboriginal societies

* the value of rock art and stone tool technology in understanding the human history

of Australia

* the archaeology of Aboriginal-European contact

An overview chapter discusses changes in the practice of Australian archaeology (and the political context in which it is undertaken) during the last two decades. The Archaeology of Aboriginal Australia also conveys the fact that there is by no means a 'party line' among practitioners about how to understand more than 40,000 years of human action.
Oceania was the last region on earth to be permanently inhabited, with the final settlers reaching Aotearoa/New Zealand approximately AD 1300. This is about the same time that related Polynesian populations began erecting Easter Island's gigantic statues, farming the valley slopes of Tahiti and similar islands, and moving finely made basalt tools over several thousand kilometers of open ocean between Hawai'i, the Marquesas, the Cook Islands, and archipelagos in between. The remarkable prehistory of Polynesia is one chapter of Oceania's human story. Almost 50,000 years prior, people entered Oceania for the first time, arriving in New Guinea and its northern offshore islands shortly thereafter, a biogeographic region labelled Near Oceania and including parts of Melanesia. Near Oceania saw the independent development of agriculture and has a complex history resulting in the greatest linguistic diversity in the world. Beginning 1000 BC, after millennia of gradually accelerating cultural change in Near Oceania, some groups sailed east from this space of inter-visible islands and entered Remote Oceania, rapidly colonizing the widely separated separated archipelagos from Vanuatu to S?moa with purposeful, return voyages, and carrying an intricately decorated pottery called Lapita. From this common cultural foundation these populations developed separate, but occasionally connected, cultural traditions over the next 3000 years. Western Micronesia, the archipelagos of Palau, Guam and the Marianas, was also colonized around 1500 BC by canoes arriving from the west, beginning equally long sequences of increasingly complex social formations, exchange relationships and monumental constructions. All of these topics and others are presented in The Oxford Handbook of Prehistoric Oceania written by Oceania's leading archaeologists and allied researchers. Chapters describe the cultural sequences of the region's major island groups, provide the most recent explanations for diversity and change in Oceanic prehistory, and lay the foundation for the next generation of research.
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