The Spanish Republic and Civil War

Cambridge University Press
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The Spanish Civil War has gone down in history for the horrific violence that it generated. The climate of euphoria and hope that greeted the overthrow of the Spanish monarchy was utterly transformed just five years later by a cruel and destructive civil war. Here Julián Casanova, one of Spain's leading historians, offers a magisterial new account of this critical period in Spanish history. He exposes the ways in which the Republic brought into the open simmering tensions between Catholics and hardline anticlericalists, bosses and workers, Church and State, order and revolution. In 1936 these conflicts tipped over into the sacas, paseos and mass killings which are still passionately debated today. The book also explores the decisive role of the international instability of the 1930s in the duration and outcome of the conflict. Franco's victory was in the end a victory for Hitler and Mussolini and for dictatorship over democracy.
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About the author

Julin Casanova is Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Zaragoza, Spain. He is one of the leading experts on the Second Republic and Spanish Civil War and has published widely in Spanish and English translations.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Jul 29, 2010
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Pages
371
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ISBN
9781139490573
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / Social History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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