The Manager’s Guide to Simple, Strategic, Service-Oriented Business Continuity

Rothstein Publishing
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You have the knowledge and skill to create a workable Business Continuity Management (BCM) program – but too often, your projects are stalled while you attempt to get the right information from the right person. Rachelle Loyear experienced these struggles for years before she successfully revamped and reinvented her company’s BCM program. In The Manager’s Guide to Simple, Strategic, Service-Oriented Business Continuity, she takes you through the practical steps to get your program back on track.

Rachelle Loyear understands your situation well. Her challenge was to manage BCM in a large enterprise that required hundreds of BC plans to be created and updated. The frustrating reality she faced was that subject matter experts in various departments held the critical information she needed, but few were willing to write their parts of the plan. She tried and failed using all the usual methods to educate and motivate – and even threaten – departments to meet her deadlines.

Finally, she decided there had to be a better way. The result was an incredibly successful BCM program that was adopted by BCM managers in other companies. She calls it “The Three S’s of BCM Success,” which can be summarized as: Simple – Strategic – Service-Oriented.

Loyear’s approach is easy and intuitive, considering the BCM discipline from the point of view of the people in your organization who are tasked to work with you on building the plans and program. She found that most people prefer:

  • Simple solutions when they are faced with something new and different.
  • Strategic use of their time, making their efforts pay off.
  • Service to be provided, lightening their part of the load while still meeting all the basic requirements.

These tactics explain why the 3S program works. It helps you, it helps your program, and it helps your program partners.

Loyear says, “If you follow the ‘Three S’ philosophy, the number of plans you need to document will be fewer, and the plans will be simpler and easier to produce. I’ve seen this method succeed repeatedly when the traditional method of handing a business leader a form to fill out or a piece of software to use has failed to produce quality plans in a timely manner.”

In The Manager’s Guide to Simple, Strategic, Sevice-Oriented Business Continuity, Loyear shows you how to:

  • Completely change your approach to the problems of “BCM buy-in.”
  • Find new ways to engage and support your BCM program partners and subject matter experts.
  • Develop easier-to-use policies, procedures, and plans.
  • Improve your overall relationships with everyone involved in your BCM program.
  • Craft a program that works around the roadblocks rather than running headlong into them.
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About the author

Rachelle Loyear, MBCP, AFBCI, CISM, PMP, has spent over a decade managing various projects and programs in corporate security organizations, focusing strongly on business continuity and organizational resilience. In her work life, she has directed teams responsible for ensuring resilience in the face of many different types of security risks, both physical and logical. Her responsibilities have included: Security/business continuity management program design and development; crisis management and emergency response planning; functional and location-based recovery and continuity planning; training personnel in crisis management and continuity; operational continuity exercises; logistical programs, such as public/private partnership relationship management; and crisis recovery resource programs.

She began her career in information technology (IT), working in programming and training design at an online training company, before moving into the telecommunications industry. She has worked in various IT roles – including Web design, user experience, business analysis, and project management – before moving into the security/business continuity arena. This diverse background enables her to approach security, risk, business continuity, and disaster recovery with a broad methodology that melds many aspects into a cohesive whole.

Rachelle holds a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix. She is certified as a Master Business Continuity Professional (MBCP) through DRI International, as an Associate Fellow of Business Continuity International (AFBCI), as a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) through ISACA, and as a Project Management Professional (PMP) through the Project Management Institute (PMI). She is active in multiple business continuity management industry groups, and is vice-chair of the Crisis Management and Business Continuity Council of ASIS International as well as serving on the IT Security Council. With Brian Allen, she co-authored The Manager’s Guide to Enterprise Security Risk Management: Essentials of Risk-Based Security(Rothstein Publishing, 2016).

Kristen Noakes-Fry, ABCI, is Executive Editor at Rothstein Publishing. Previously, she was a Research Director, Information Security and Risk Group, for Gartner, Inc.; Associate Editor at Datapro (McGraw- Hill); and Associate Professor of English at Atlantic Cape College in New Jersey. She holds an M.A. from New York University and a B.A. from Russell Sage College.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Rothstein Publishing
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Published on
May 10, 2017
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Pages
144
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ISBN
9781944480387
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Insurance / General
Business & Economics / Insurance / Risk Assessment & Management
Business & Economics / Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Risk assessment is required for just about all business plans or decisions. As a responsible manager, you need to consider threats to your organization’s resilience. But to determine probability and impact – and reduce your risk – can be a daunting task. Guided by Douglas M. Henderson’s The Manager’s Guide to Risk Assessment: Getting It Right, you will confidently follow a clearly explained, step-by-step process to conduct a risk assessment.

As you embark on the risk assessment process, you could not find a better and more uniquely qualified guide than Douglas M. Henderson. His 20+ years of experience with major consulting firms includes certification as a professional actuary and business continuity planner. His actuarial knowledge makes him an expert in applying mathematical and statistical methods to help organizations to assess and manage risks. He has applied this real-world knowledge of risk to helping businesses prepare for emergencies and business interruptions of all types.

Henderson offers samples and checklists, including case studies using a fictional company in which he conducts a complete qualitative risk assessment and then a complete quantitative risk assessment, then arrives at a set of comparable actions. His explanations and sample problems will help you to:

Define risk management terms, such as threat, event, and risk control. Identify threats and determine the worst-case situation your organization could face. Collect information on probability for natural and non-natural threats. Understand the difference between qualitative and quantitative risk assessment. Describe probability and impact levels. Identify exposures and examine specific risk controls. Estimate a financial value for implementing a risk control. Determine when outside professional help is needed.

As an added bonus, Henderson explores the topic of risk controls with you, helping you to evaluate what risk controls will best reduce the probability of disruptive events and reduce their impact should they occur. To insure the best investment of time and money, you will perform a cost-benefit analysis for each possible risk control to make the best choice for your organization.

You designed your Business Continuity Plan to keep your business in business regardless of the forces of man and nature. But how do you know that the plan really works? Few companies can afford the recommended full-scale exercises several times a year. In The Manager’s Guide to Business Continuity Exercises, Jim Burtles, an internationally known expert, details the options for conducting a range of tests and exercises to keep your plan effective and up to date.

Your challenge is to maintain a good and effective plan in the face of changing circumstances and limited budgets. If your situation is like that in most companies, you really cannot depend on the results of last year’s test or exercise of the plan. People tend to forget, lose confidence, lose interest, or even be replaced by other people who were not involved in your original planning. Jim Burtles explains:

“You cannot have any real confidence in your plans and procedures until they have been fully tested...Exercises are the only way we can be sure that the people will be able to interpret the plans and procedures correctly within the requisite timeframe under difficult circumstances.”

As you do your job in this constantly shifting context, Jim Burtles helps you to: • Differentiate between an “exercise” and a “test” – and see the value of each in your BC program. • Understand the different types of plans and identify the people who need to be involved in exercises and tests for each. • Use the “Five-Stage Growth Path” – from desktop to walkthrough to full-scale exercise -- to conduct gradual testing, educate personnel, foster capability, and build confidence. • Create a variety of unusual scenario plot-lines that will keep up everyone’s interest. • Identify the eight main elements in developing and delivering a successful BC exercise. • Select and prepare a “delivery team” and a “response team” for your exercise. • Make sure everyone understands the “rules of engagement.” • Use the lessons learned from exercises and tests to audit, update, and maintain the plan.

You are well aware that a host of problems may crop up in any kind of company-wide project. These problems can range from basic logistics like time and place, to non-support from executives and managers, to absenteeism, to the weather, to participants forgetting their lines. Throughout the book, Burtles uses his decades of experience working with companies like yours to give you useful examples, case studies, and down-to-earth advice to help you handle the unexpected and work toward the results you are looking for.

Avoid being “blindsided” by an unexpected emergency or crisis in the workplace – violence, natural disaster, or worse! Bruce Blythe’s The Manager’s Guide to Quick Response in a Crisis: Effective Action in an Emergency offers the time-tested skills that prepare you to act effectively – on behalf of yourself and your co-workers – in the face of threat and chaos. Blythe uses real-world case studies, examples, and checklists to help you be the top-notch leader the situation requires.

“Hope for the best and prepare for the worst” sums up Blythe’s philosophy. This short book is the essence of the basic practical counseling that he would give if he were sitting next to you at your desk. To help you figure out what to do next, he offers real-world examples of what has worked – and not worked – in his 30+ years of experience with companies just like yours.

With Blythe’s advice, you can act fast to:

Find out the accurate facts you need to strategize and implement a response. Compile a checklist of immediate action items. Create a crisis command center (CCC. Select the best people for your action team and determine action steps. . Understand how to make good decisions in a crisis or emergency. . Handle the human side of a traumatic incident. . Set priorities in multiple timeframes. . Establish a “new normal” as everyone phases back into productive work after the incident.

To help you take the actions that will make a difference, the book includes:

Practical forms, checklists, cases studies, and real-life examples. “Quick Use Response Guide” at the end of each chapter – all four can form a handy pocket guide.
As a manager, you can usually handle disruptive employees. But sometimes, their emotional states foster workplace tension, even making them a danger to others. Your own confidence is at risk. In The Manager’s Guide to Bullies in the Workplace: Coping with Emotional Terrorists, noted counselor Dr. Vali Hawkins Mitchell gives you sensible advice for keeping the bully from dominating the workgroup and destroying productivity – and maintaining your own healthy emotional balance at the same time.

Sometimes the difficult person is an overt physical bully, which makes it easy to simply fire the person. Much of the time, however, the problems are more subtle and build up over periods of time. They undermine your ability to manage your team – and they can spread to the rest of the team, destroying teamwork and productivity. In this short book, Dr. Vali helps you to:

Recognize the types of upsetting work situations that bullies exploit to their own advantage, such as change, grief, and violence. Understand why emotional terrorists make it so difficult for you, as a manager, to deal with their behavior. . See the symptomatic tools and techniques of the emotional terrorist, such as harassment, lying to supervisors, tampering with documents, etc. . Conduct training to help other managers and team members recognize and handle the signs of impending emotional conflict – you will love the “Snakes in the Schoolyard” exercise. . Know exactly what to say and not say when you must have a one-on-one interview with someone you consider to be a bully. . Be an effective manager in a world of challenges – protecting and preserving the mental health of your employees and yourself. .

Dr. Vali uses realistic examples and humor to help you handle the challenges you face – and to show the degree to which she really understands your situation. With her guidance, you will be more comfortable with knowing when you can handle the situation through simply being the good manager, when you need to call in an outside mental health professional, and when you need to call 911.

Attracting media attention is surprisingly easy -- you just want it to be the right kind! If an event causes the phone to ring and TV cameras to appear in your lobby, you need confidence that the people who happen to be at your worksite that day are prepared. That’s easy if everyone – executives, PR, managers, and employees – is familiar with Jim Lukaszewski’s sure-fire methods for handling the media.

James (Jim) Lukaszewski, America’s Crisis Guru TM, is one of the most visible corporate go-to people for companies when there is trouble in the room or on the horizon. The Manager’s Guide to Handling the Media in a Crisis: Doing and Saying the Right Thing When it Matters Most, shares with you the skills he has developed in 30+ years of helping companies in crisis management, employee communications, ethics, media relations, public affairs, reputation preservation, leadership restoration, and recovery. Jim speaks annually before a wide variety of local, statewide, national and international organizations and associations heard by thousands of each year – and in this book, he is speaking directly to you.

With this book as a guide, you will be able to:

Create and deliver the message that best represents your organization. Understand what it takes to be an effective spokesperson. . Make sure everyone is aware of company policies and procedures relating to the press. . Be aware of the needs, deadlines, and priorities of reporters. . Prepare to give good answers to all sorts of questions. . Monitor social media, assess its impact. . Identify the ways social media could be used to attack your company. . Preserve company reputation amid a flurry of conflicting publicity. .

Reading this book, you will see why, wherever there is or can be trouble and crisis, affected audiences and troubled leaders are waiting to learn the way out of their problems from Jim. The book is practical, easy to read, filled with real-world case studies, checklists, anecdotes, discussion questions, and easy-to-remember tips for success.

Now updated — your guide to getting the best insurance policy

Are you intimidated by insurance? Have no fear — this easy-to-understand guide explains everything you need to know, from getting the most coverage at the best price to dealing with adjusters, filing claims, and more. Whether you're looking for personal or business insurance, you'll see how to avoid common pitfalls, lower your costs, and get what you deserve at claim time.

Get to know the basics — understand how to make good insurance decisions and reduce the chances of a financial loss in your life

Take your insurance on the road — manage your personal automobile risks, handle special situations, insure recreational vehicles, and deal with insurance adjusters

Understand homeowner's and renter's insurance — know what is and isn't covered by typical policies, common exclusions and pitfalls, and how to cover yourself against personal lawsuits

Buy the right umbrella policy — discover the advantages, and coordinate your policies to cover the gaps

Manage life, health, and disability risks — explore individual and group policies, understand Medicare basics, and evaluate long-term disability and long-term-care insurance

Open the book and find:

The best life, health, home, and auto policies

Strategies for handling the claims process to get what you deserve

Tips on adjusting your deductible to suit your lifestyle

How to navigate healthcare policies

Ways to reduce your risk and your premiums

Common traps and loopholes

Considerations for grads, freelancers, and remote workers

“Entertaining and informative. Desai takes us on a journey through the fundamentals of finance, from asset pricing to risk and risk management, via options, mergers, debt, and bankruptcy."- John Lanchester, The New Yorker

"A fascinating new perspective on modern finance," --Oliver Hart, 2016 Nobel Laureate in Economics

"Lucid, witty and delightfully erudite...From the French revolution to film noir, from the history of probability to Jane Austen and The Simpsons, this is an astonishing intellectual feast." --Sebastian Mallaby, author of The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

Longlisted for 2017 Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year 

A 2017 AMAZON PICK IN BUSINESS & LEADERSHIP

A WealthManagement.com BEST BUSINESS BOOK OF 2017

In 1688, essayist Josef de la Vega described finance as both “the fairest and most deceitful business . . . the noblest and the most infamous in the world, the finest and most vulgar on earth.”

The characterization of finance as deceitful, infamous, and vulgar still rings true today – particularly in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. But, what happened to the fairest, noblest, and finest profession that de la Vega saw? 

De la Vega hit on an essential truth that has been forgotten: finance can be just as principled, life-affirming, and worthy as it can be fraught with questionable practices.  Today, finance is shrouded in mystery for outsiders, while many insiders are uneasy with the disrepute of their profession.  How can finance become more accessible and also recover its nobility?

Harvard Business School professor Mihir Desai, in his “last lecture” to the graduating Harvard MBA class of 2015, took up the cause of restoring humanity to finance. With incisive wit and irony, his lecture drew upon a rich knowledge of literature, film, history, and philosophy to explain the inner workings of finance in a manner that has never been seen before.

This book captures Desai’s lucid exploration of the ideas of finance as seen through the unusual prism of the humanities. Through this novel, creative approach, Desai shows that outsiders can access the underlying ideas easily and insiders can reacquaint themselves with the core humanity of their profession.

The mix of finance and the humanities creates unusual pairings: Jane Austen and Anthony Trollope are guides to risk management; Jeff Koons becomes an advocate of leverage; and Mel Brooks’s The Producers teaches us about fiduciary responsibility. In Desai’s vision, the principles of finance also provide answers to critical questions in our lives. Among many surprising parallels, bankruptcy teaches us how to react to failure, the lessons of mergers apply to marriages, and the Capital Asset Pricing Model demonstrates the true value of relationships.
THE WISDOM OF FINANCE is a wholly unique book, offering a refreshing new perspective on one of the world’s most complex and misunderstood professions.    
When faced with a ’human error’ problem, you may be tempted to ask 'Why didn’t these people watch out better?' Or, 'How can I get my people more engaged in safety?' You might think you can solve your safety problems by telling your people to be more careful, by reprimanding the miscreants, by issuing a new rule or procedure and demanding compliance. These are all expressions of 'The Bad Apple Theory' where you believe your system is basically safe if it were not for those few unreliable people in it. Building on its successful predecessors, the third edition of The Field Guide to Understanding ’Human Error’ will help you understand a new way of dealing with a perceived 'human error' problem in your organization. It will help you trace how your organization juggles inherent trade-offs between safety and other pressures and expectations, suggesting that you are not the custodian of an already safe system. It will encourage you to start looking more closely at the performance that others may still call 'human error', allowing you to discover how your people create safety through practice, at all levels of your organization, mostly successfully, under the pressure of resource constraints and multiple conflicting goals. The Field Guide to Understanding 'Human Error' will help you understand how to move beyond 'human error'; how to understand accidents; how to do better investigations; how to understand and improve your safety work. You will be invited to think creatively and differently about the safety issues you and your organization face. In each, you will find possibilities for a new language, for different concepts, and for new leverage points to influence your own thinking and practice, as well as that of your colleagues and organization. If you are faced with a ’human error’ problem, abandon the fallacy of a quick fix. Read this book.
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