Latin American Coral Reefs

Elsevier
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Most of the coral reefs of the American continent: the Brazilian waters, the Caribbean Sea and the eastern Pacific Ocean are in Latin American countries, the subject of this book. For the first time, information on coral reefs of such a vast region is mined from reports, obscure journals, university thesis and scientific journals, summarized and presented in a way both accessible and informative for the interested reader as well as for the coral reef expert. The chapters of the book, divided by country and ocean, were written by either scientists from the countries or by those that know the area well. Reefs not documented in the past are described in detail here, including location maps. The natural and anthropogenic impacts affecting the reefs are presented, as well as sections on management, conservation and legislation in each country. Nineteen chapters, plus an introduction, present information of coral reefs from Brazil to Mexico, and from Chile to Cuba.


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Additional Information

Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Apr 25, 2003
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Pages
508
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ISBN
9780080535395
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Marine Biology
Technology & Engineering / Fisheries & Aquaculture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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