An Inventory of the Ancient Monuments in Glamorgan: Volume III: Medieval secular monuments. The early castles - from the Norman Conquest to 1217: Volume III: Medieval secular monuments. The early castles - from the Norman Conquest to 1217

Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
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Fifty-seven castles founded in Glamorgan by 1217 are here
described. These include mottes. castle-ringworks, and presumed Welsh
earthworks, all without masonry, as well as sixteen masonry castles ranging
from well known sites at Cardiff, Coity, and Ogmore, to the Welsh stone castle
now identified at Plas Baglan. Later defensive monuments will be described in
part lb.

Glamorgan castles occur in unrivalled density, their study
enriched by an exceptional range of works on local history and records. County
borders embrace the lordships ot'Gower and Glamorgan. Most castles lie in the
fertile lowlands where Norman rule was imposed. Welsh independence endured in
the uplands until the mid-13th-century conquests of the Clare lords. When they
inherited Glamorgan in 1217 Norman rule had survived unbroken in the lowlands
from the late-11th century, if not in Gower. Profusely illustrated descriptions
incorporate comprehensive historical accounts. The Introductory Survey and Sectional
Preambles discuss the evidence, illustrated by maps and diagrams. Significant
conclusions emerge: William the Conqueror founded Cardiff in 1081; Glacial
drift provides a determinant for the segregation of mottes and
castle-ringworks; Roman roads, forts, and river crossings influenced Norman
settlement; Early Masonry Castles, rare in Wales, were numerous in Glamorgan.
Castle of the lords of Glamorgan are of particular interest, especially
Newcastle, which might be attributed to Henry II. These lords included King
John (1189-1216) and leading magnates of the realm: Rufus's favourite, Robert
Fitzhamon (1093-1107); Robert, earl of Gloucester, base son of Henry I (fa.
1J13-47); and later, the great Clare earls (1217-1314) and Edward II's
favourite, Hugh Despenser (1317-26).





Content

Map of sites treated in this Part (la) of Volume IIII

Chairman's Preface

Report, with a List of Monuments selected by the Commissioners

as most worthy of preservation

List of Commissioners and Staff

Authorship and Compilation

Presentation of Material



Introductory Survey

I The Division of the material; Parts la and lb Explained

II The Geographical Background

III The Historical Background (1072-1217)

IV The Early Castles Discussed



Inventory of the Early Castles

Section MO: Mottes without Masonry

Section CR: Castle-Ringworks without Masonry

Section UW: Unclassified, probably Welsh Castles

Section VE: Vanished Early Castles

Section MM: Masonry Castles Built Over Mottes

Section MR: Masonry Castles built over Castle-ringworks

Section EM: Early Masonry Castles



Abbreviated Titles of References

Map and List of Ecclesiastical Parishes, with incidence of Monuments

Map and List of Civil Parishes, with incidence of Monuments

Index of National Grid References for sites treated in Part la

Glossary: General

Glossary: Welsh Terms and Place-name Elements

List of Figures, including maps and photographs

General Index

Alphabetical List of sites treated in Part 1 b of Volume III

Map of sites treated in Part lb of Volume III

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Additional Information

Publisher
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
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Published on
Dec 31, 1991
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Pages
391
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ISBN
9780113000357
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Buildings / General
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Eligible for Family Library

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 This publication forms Part i of the Royal Commission's Inventory of the Prehistoric and Roman remains of the County of Brecknock (Brycheiniog). Part ii, Hill-Forts and Roman remains was produced in 1986. This volume covers Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age sites with all undefended and unenclosed settlements of probable pre-Norman date, together with summary finds lists and a handlist of Dark Age inscribed stones. Of particular interest in this volume are plans of the unenclosed settlements, some forming parts of palimpsest landscapes, the survey of which was a new departure for the Royal Commission.

Inventory
Part i: Later Prehistoric Monuments and Unenclosed Settlements to 1000 A.D.
Physical Background and Post-glacial History
Cave Archaeology
Prehistoric (and later) cave sites
The Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Periods
Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic sites and findspots
Neolithic Settlement and Burial
Neolithic Court Tombs
Burial and Ritual Structures of the Bronze Age
Round Cairns and Barrows of the Bronze Age
Other Bronze Age Burials and Lost Cairns; Tithe Award and other Placenames
Stone Circles and Stone Settings
Stone Circles and Stone Settings: the sites
Standing Stones
Standing Stones: the sites
Mounds of Burned Stone
Burned Mounds
Later Prehistoric and Protohistoric Settlement
Unenclosed Settlements
Hillforts (Addendum to Vol 1 (ii)
Early Medieval Landholding, Estates and Ecclesiastical Centres
Crannog
A Handlist of Early Christian Stones
Later Prehistoric Lithic Finds
Handlist of Bronze Age Bronze Artefacts
Index of National Grid References
Glossary: General
Glossary: Welsh Place-name Elements
General Index

This book establishes a proper firefighting mindset and promotes maintaining preparedness for the extreme physical and mental demands of firefighting operations in high-rise and standpipe equipped buildings. Armed with firefighting weapons that would be much more appropriate at a car fire, far too many fire departments are on a collision course with disaster and tragedy, should they encounter a serious high-rise fire. Countless false alarms, along with "good luck" while relying on bad habits, have greatly exacerbated the deadly disease of complacency. District Chief McGrail draws from his 25 years of experience, along with the lessons learned from many other fire service professionals, to provide a foundation for success and safety during high-rise and standpipe operations. The words "Everyone Comes Home" are just words. The actions necessary to ensure that everyone does come home are based on a lifelong commitment to excellence, and the consistent application of good fireground habits. This book is a compilation of those good habits and the many lessons learned by a man who is truly passionate about firefighting and firefighter safety and survival.

Among the many valuable topics covered in this book are:
* Standpipe system pressure regulating devices, pressure restricting devices and pressure reducing valves * Cautious and disciplined elevator use during high-rise operations
* Elevator rescue operations
* Proper engine company suppression selection, including techniques to operate more powerful firefighting weapons with limited manpower
* Air support operations during high-rise emergencies, with or without an internal resource
 This publication forms Part i of the Royal Commission's Inventory of the Prehistoric and Roman remains of the County of Brecknock (Brycheiniog). Part ii, Hill-Forts and Roman remains was produced in 1986. This volume covers Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age sites with all undefended and unenclosed settlements of probable pre-Norman date, together with summary finds lists and a handlist of Dark Age inscribed stones. Of particular interest in this volume are plans of the unenclosed settlements, some forming parts of palimpsest landscapes, the survey of which was a new departure for the Royal Commission.

Inventory
Part i: Later Prehistoric Monuments and Unenclosed Settlements to 1000 A.D.
Physical Background and Post-glacial History
Cave Archaeology
Prehistoric (and later) cave sites
The Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Periods
Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic sites and findspots
Neolithic Settlement and Burial
Neolithic Court Tombs
Burial and Ritual Structures of the Bronze Age
Round Cairns and Barrows of the Bronze Age
Other Bronze Age Burials and Lost Cairns; Tithe Award and other Placenames
Stone Circles and Stone Settings
Stone Circles and Stone Settings: the sites
Standing Stones
Standing Stones: the sites
Mounds of Burned Stone
Burned Mounds
Later Prehistoric and Protohistoric Settlement
Unenclosed Settlements
Hillforts (Addendum to Vol 1 (ii)
Early Medieval Landholding, Estates and Ecclesiastical Centres
Crannog
A Handlist of Early Christian Stones
Later Prehistoric Lithic Finds
Handlist of Bronze Age Bronze Artefacts
Index of National Grid References
Glossary: General
Glossary: Welsh Place-name Elements
General Index

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