Steel and Blood: South Vietnamese Armor and the War for Southeast Asia

Naval Institute Press
Free sample

Col. Ha Mai Viet presents a historically accurate and detailed account of the Vietnam War from the perspective of the South Vietnamese armor forces. Highly decorated for his valor and leadership of the armored units, the author spent ten years documenting what went on so he could offer an analysis of the war based on facts. He interviewed hundreds of people, including all senior South Vietnamese officers involved and many of lesser rank, as well as American advisers. Viet tells the story without glossing over the shortcomings of his fellow soldiers. His efforts serve as an invaluable record of his army's organization, combat operations, and interaction with U.S. advisers. Published in cooperation with the Association of the United States Army.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Naval Institute Press
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Published on
Nov 15, 2013
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Pages
512
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ISBN
9781612514338
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Vietnam War
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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More than 8.7 million Americans reported for military duty in Southeast Asia, but only a select few wore the Green Beret, the distinctive symbol of the U.S. Army Special Forces. Operating out of small outposts in some of the worlds most rugged terrain, these elite soldiers played a crucial role during the protracted conflict.

Special Forces at War: an Illustrated History, Southeast Asia 1957-1975 by wartime veteran and military historian Shelby l. Stanton comprises ten chapters, chronologically arranged, that show Special Forces' activity from the first deployments of Green Berets into battle, through their ever-expanding instruction and training, wartime advisory, border surveillance, strike force, and special operations roles. No matter what the task, the Special Forces served with valor and dedication.

This photographic history is unprecedented in scope. Featuring rare and unpublished images, it presents an exclusive, insider view of covert activities such as Project Delta, whose Special Forces-trained Vietnamese commandos, nicknamed "road-runners," posed as North Vietnamese Army or Viet Cong troops behind communist lines. It depicts Special Forces' camps before, during, and after enemy assaults. It features an array of lethal weapons used by resourceful Green Berets fighting to preserve their remote outposts, as well as allied and enemy documents and propaganda. From ordinary camp life to special missions, no aspect of Special Forces activities during the Second Indochina War has been overlooked. Stanton knows his subject first hand.

During six years of active duty as an infantry officer in the U.S. Army, he served as a paratrooper platoon leader, an airborne ranger advisor to the Royal Thai Army Special Warfare Center, and a Special Forces long-range reconnaissance team commander in Southeast Asia before being wounded in combat in Nam Yu, LaosThrough his contacts with Special Forces veterans and his own research, Stanton has assembled hundreds of photographs, details.
Stunning in its insight, On Strategy is required reading not just for everyone who is interested in the Vietnam War, but for anyone who is concerned about the place of the United States on the world stage and how America can, and more importantly cannot, employ its immense military force to help bring peace to an increasingly troubled world.

“On Stategy is just about the best thing I have read on Vietnam.”—Drew Middleton, The New York Times
 
“Perhaps the most trenchant single postmortem to date of our defeat in Vietnam . . . a classic . . . compact, subtle—and surprisingly readable.”—Newsweek
 
“At our house, we sleep less easily now that Harry G. Summers Jr., Colonel of Infantry, is no longer defending us. After two wars and 38 years of active duty, Summers has retired from the Army. . . . Every taxpayer should mourn his loss. Colonel Summers is perhaps the most influential thinker of our time: his book On Strategy is required reading at the Army and Naval War Colleges.”—Jack Beatty,  Boston Globe
 
“This investigation of the U.S. army’s role in the Vietnam War is widely recognized as the single most useful postmortem on the unpopular war.”—The Washington Post Book World
 
“The most detailed exposition of this view—that the U.S. threw away whatever chance for victory it may have had through blunders that must not be repeated—comes from Col. Harry Summers, whose book, On Strategy, has become must reading for young officers.”—Time
 
“A masterful analysis of the strategy, or lack thereof, in the Vietnam War . . . The best critique of the war I have read and a book every policy maker in Washington should absorb.”—Max Cleland, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Heres about the book: Twenty-one years after leaving Vietnam for the first time, the author attends a reunion of former pilots who flew helicopters in Vietnam. Reuniting with his classmates and some of his fellow pilots he flew with in Vietnam brings back a rush of memories and stories of times past. The following years reunions build on the first as more and more of the pilots he served with are reunited. The reunions stir memories and deeds of times past are recounted in a steady stream of war stories. He soon realizes that he doesnt want these stories -- these war stories -- lost and decides to write them down before he forgets the details. As the stories unfold more memories come back and he records them too. His intent was not to document the history of the US involvement in the Vietnam War, nor be a definitive history of the famous B Troop 1st Squadron, 9th US Cavalry Regiment. His intent was to record his personal memory of the events some 30 plus years ago from his perspective. He talks about growing up in Brooklyn, living in his grandmothers house on 40th Street, his gang of friends from Saint Michaels Church, and of the events that led to his decision to volunteer for the draft. Tracing the draft process he tells of narrowly avoiding being drafted in the Marine Corps. He continues to tell the story of his journey through the armys classification and assignment system that results with him being selected for helicopter pilot training.

The life of a warrant officer candidate presented a number of challenges that needed to be overcome if his plan to beat the army system was to be realized. He tells of some of the more interesting incidents in his flight training and preparation for combat. Things changed after earning his wings and arriving in Vietnam. Somewhere along the line the reality of the situation presents itself and John volunteers for the famous reconnaissance squadron of the 1st Cavalry Division. The 1st of the 9th was known for its ferocity in combat and its high casualty rate especially among flight crews. History records that this single unit was responsible for a large percentage of the entire divisions enemy kills. His description of some of the sights and sounds of life in B Troop will surely remind other veterans of their time in Vietnam. He will certainly stir the memories of others that served in the air cavalry and perhaps even others who were supported by them. The stories are real. The people are real. John Flanagan writes them, as he would tell them to you in person. Sometimes funny, sometimes serious, sometimes rambling, sometimes clearly, but always truthfully and as he remembers them.

The result of these writings are Born in Brooklyn - Raised in the Cav. The Aviation Museum at Fort Rucker Alabama, the 1st Cavalry Museum at Fort Hood Texas, keeps this book in stock. A reviewer said: "I learned to better appreciate the Army helo pilot, January 30, 2004 Reviewer: E M from san diego, ca USA Well, it certainly is a long journey from the dreary streets of Brooklyn to the miserable and dangerous fields and skies of Viet Nam at war. Major Flanagan has travelled this route and shares his adventure with the reader. He is a real American hero... as are all his brethren flying warrant officers. Yet he tells his story without bravado or arrogance. He is simply telling the story of his experience in Viet Nam as a young 19 year old plucked from the streets of Brooklyn and injected into the chaos of war . He writes of his training as well as his wartime experiences. Often his enemy was the weather as much as the NVA on the ground. Major Flanagan writes in a simple, readable style without pretension; his memories are direct, straightforward and sprinkled with a dash of Irish wit and humor. If one wants to know the life of an Army helo pilot on the front lines of the Viet Nam war, this is a book to read. Beyond the daily life of the helo pilot, we also lear

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