Higher Education in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Springer

This open access collection examines how higher education responds to the demands of the automation economy and the fourth industrial revolution. Considering significant trends in how people are learning, coupled with the ways in which different higher education institutions and education stakeholders are implementing adaptations, it looks at new programs and technological advances that are changing how and why we teach and learn. The book addresses trends in liberal arts integration of STEM innovations, the changing role of libraries in the digital age, global trends in youth mobility, and the development of lifelong learning programs. This is coupled with case study assessments of the various ways China, Singapore, South Africa and Costa Rica are preparing their populations for significant shifts in labour market demands – shifts that are already underway. Offering examples of new frameworks in which collaboration between government, industry, and higher education institutions can prevent lagging behind in this fast changing environment, this book is a key read for anyone wanting to understand how the world should respond to the radical technological shifts underway on the frontline of higher education.
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About the author

Nancy W. Gleason is Director of the Centre for Teaching & Learning at Yale-NUS, Singapore, where she overseas faculty development in teaching and student support in learning through the distinctive pedagogy of the liberal arts. She is a Senior Lecturer of Global Affairs in the Social Sciences Division, teaching and researching on pathways of globalisation, higher education, liberal arts education in Asia, and the fourth industrial revolution.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Jun 21, 2018
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Pages
229
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ISBN
9789811301940
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Adult & Continuing Education
Education / Computers & Technology
Education / Higher
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Literary Criticism / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A decade after the Bologna Declaration has called for the establishment of a cycle system of study programmes and degrees all over Europe the changes actually having occurred in this reform process can be measured and assessed. To what extent did the bachelor students gained international experiences during or after their study program? What is the proportion of bachelor degree holders who are employed about one year after graduation? What are the labor market experiences of those bachelor graduates who started to work? Was it difficult to gain relevant employment? What are the employment conditions for bachelor graduates in terms of income, position, working time, unlimited term contracts compared to traditional graduates? To what extent are bachelor graduates working in areas with close relation to their field of study (horizontal match)? Is their level of education needed for their work tasks (vertical match)? These are the key questions which will be answered in this volume based on surveys of graduates from institutions of higher education recently undertaken in ten European countries (Austria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Norway, Netherlands, Poland, and United Kingdom). The bachelor-master-structure actually implemented varies substantially between the countries and also the consequences of these reforms differ strikingly. In some countries, more students spend a period of study abroad than the goal set for the year 2020 in the Bologna Process; in other countries, not yet a quarter of the expected rate is achieved. Also the frequency of bachelor graduates differs by country who opt for further study, transfer to employment or are both employed and students. The comparative study also provides a wealth of information about the employment and work situation of bachelor graduates as compared to other graduates from institutions of higher education. The book provides relevant information for students and teaching staff at institutions of higher education, employers and politicians and administrative staff dealing with higher education issues.
How students get the materials they need as opportunities for higher education expand but funding shrinks.

From the top down, Shadow Libraries explores the institutions that shape the provision of educational materials, from the formal sector of universities and publishers to the broadly informal ones organized by faculty, copy shops, student unions, and students themselves. It looks at the history of policy battles over access to education in the post–World War II era and at the narrower versions that have played out in relation to research and textbooks, from library policies to book subsidies to, more recently, the several “open” publication models that have emerged in the higher education sector.

From the bottom up, Shadow Libraries explores how, simply, students get the materials they need. It maps the ubiquitous practice of photocopying and what are—in many cases—the more marginal ones of buying books, visiting libraries, and downloading from unauthorized sources. It looks at the informal networks that emerge in many contexts to share materials, from face-to-face student networks to Facebook groups, and at the processes that lead to the consolidation of some of those efforts into more organized archives that circulate offline and sometimes online— the shadow libraries of the title. If Alexandra Elbakyan's Sci-Hub is the largest of these efforts to date, the more characteristic part of her story is the prologue: the personal struggle to participate in global scientific and educational communities, and the recourse to a wide array of ad hoc strategies and networks when formal, authorized means are lacking. If Elbakyan's story has struck a chord, it is in part because it brings this contradiction in the academic project into sharp relief—universalist in principle and unequal in practice. Shadow Libraries is a study of that tension in the digital era.

Contributors
Balázs Bodó, Laura Czerniewicz, Miroslaw Filiciak, Mariana Fossatti, Jorge Gemetto, Eve Gray, Evelin Heidel, Joe Karaganis, Lawrence Liang, Pedro Mizukami, Jhessica Reia, Alek Tarkowski

How to Learn a New Language in as Little as a Few Months – and Have a Boatload of Fun Doing It

Let me make a prediction.

I predict that many, many hundreds of people who will read this description will close this page in a few seconds.

“Learn a new language in a few months? Are you out of your mind?” they’ll say. “It’s just too good to be true.”

And they will go back to their old language learning methods.

You know which methods: toiling away at mind-numbing grammar exercises, learning words nobody uses, and, most importantly, never actually using your skills to communicate with another person.

If you’re still with me, I expect you to be different. You think there must be something better. After all, how could people master more than one foreign language in their lives if it usually takes a regular person several years just to learn the basics?

The answer is simple – in one way or another, they follow the methods I share in How to Learn Any Language in a Few Months While Enjoying Yourself. They not only learn up to ten times faster than other people, they also have a lot of fun while doing it.

How to Learn Any Language in a Few Months While Enjoying Yourself is for you if you want to learn:

- without this one thing, you’ll never learn a new language in just a few months. Learn what it is and how to apply it to your everyday life to practice your skills while doing your daily activities.

- a completely free way to get native speakers to proofread your writings (and even explain to you all of your mistakes). This one site alone can dramatically improve your writing skills.

- an extremely easy way to find a native speaker willing to help you learn her mother language. It’s almost like having a private tutor.

- the proper way to improve your listening skills while watching movies. Most people learning a foreign language do it the wrong way and it does nothing to improve their abilities.

- how to achieve more with less when learning languages. You don’t have to spend hours and hours cramming every single word and grammar rule. In fact, it works to your detriment. Learn what to do instead.

- 9 common mistakes to avoid when learning languages. Reading this chapter alone can save you years of ineffective studies – especially mistake #3, so common among language learners.

- a 5-step process to improve your reading skills. You can make your learning process much more enjoyable and effective by choosing the right things to read. Learn what these things are.

- a fun idea to learn how to write the way native speakers do. You too can learn the slang and phrases only native speakers use – and know the language better than many academic professors.

- how to dramatically improve your language skills when traveling. While it isn’t necessary to go abroad to learn a language, it’s a powerful way to cram a lot of learning into just a few days.

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Why kill yourself doing things the old, non-effective way, if you could make the process much easier and enjoy it more, too?

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Mindshift reveals how we can overcome stereotypes and preconceived ideas about what is possible for us to learn and become.
 
At a time when we are constantly being asked to retrain and reinvent ourselves to adapt to new technologies and changing industries, this book shows us how we can uncover and develop talents we didn’t realize we had—no matter what our age or background. We’re often told to “follow our passions.” But in Mindshift, Dr. Barbara Oakley shows us how we can broaden our passions. Drawing on the latest neuroscientific insights, Dr. Oakley shepherds us past simplistic ideas of “aptitude” and “ability,” which provide only a snapshot of who we are now—with little consideration about how we can change.
     Even seemingly “bad” traits, such as a poor memory, come with hidden advantages—like increased creativity. Profiling people from around the world who have overcome learning limitations of all kinds, Dr. Oakley shows us how we can turn perceived weaknesses, such as impostor syndrome and advancing age, into strengths. People may feel like they’re at a disadvantage if they pursue a new field later in life; yet those who change careers can be fertile cross-pollinators: They bring valuable insights from one discipline to another. Dr. Oakley teaches us strategies for learning that are backed by neuroscience so that we can realize the joy and benefits of a learning lifestyle. Mindshift takes us deep inside the world of how people change and grow. Our biggest stumbling blocks can be our own preconceptions, but with the right mental insights, we can tap into hidden potential and create new opportunities.
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