Soul Stories: Safari to Mara and Aria of the Horned Toad

Genoa House
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"The characters in Soul Stories are so alive and compelling that they jump off the page right into your heart. Clark-Stern has the rare ability to blend her imaginative poetic voice with exciting page turning plots. Soul Stories will not only touch and engage young readers but are great adventures that will appeal to all ages."--Beverly Olevin, winner of Kirkus Discoveries Best Fiction 2010 The Good Side of Bad

Soul Stories explores two worlds: the world we know with our feelings and senses--sight, scent, touch, belonging, joy, loss, renewal--and the parallel world of dreams, intuition, imagination, and the dimension of the unknown. Together these realms inform, shape, challenge, and nurture the soul. 

Safari to Mara finds our heroine on the brink of womanhood in Masai society. The only daughter in a sonless family, she is drafted to do work in the modern world, yet tradition calls her to prepare for initiation as a wife. In the wilderness of her namesake, Kenya’s Masai Mara, she finds an improbable guide who leads her into the mysterious recesses of her awakening heart.

Aria of the Horned Toad begins with the dream of a horned toad crawling out of Beatrice’s eyes,“so real I could feel his prickly little feet on my nose.” And so begins an odyssey to the source of all dreaming. Beatrice believes that in this dark and luminous place, she can find someone to fashion a dream to fix her Mama’s terrible ways, and soothe the longing in her own wild spirit.

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About the author

Elizabeth Clark-Stern is a psychotherapist in private practice in Seattle,Washington. Before embracing this beloved work, she worked as a professional screenwriter. Her produced plays and teleplays include All I Could See From Where I Stood, Help Wanted, and To See The Elephant. Her play, Out of the Shadows: A Story of Toni Wolff and Emma Jung (Genoa House 2010), was performed at the International Jungian Congress in South Africa in 2007.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Genoa House
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
180
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ISBN
9781926975009
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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