Financing the 2008 Election: Assessing Reform

Brookings Institution Press
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The 2008 elections were by any standard historic. The nation elected its first African American president, and the Republicans nominated their first female candidate for vice president. More money was raised and spent on federal contests than in any election in U.S. history. Barack Obama raised a record-setting $745 million for his campaign and federal candidates, party committees, and interest groups also raised and spent record-setting amounts. Moreover, the way money was raised by some candidates and party committees has the potential to transform American politics for years to come.

The latest installment in a series that dates back half a century, Financing the 2008 Election is the definitive analysis of how campaign finance and spending shaped the historic presidential and congressional races of 2008. It explains why these records were set and what it means for the future of U.S. politics. David Magleby and Anthony Corrado have assembled a team of experts who join them in exploring the financing of the 2008 presidential and congressional elections. They provide insights into the political parties and interest groups that made campaign finance history and summarize important legal and regulatory changes that affected these elections.

Contributors: Allan Cigler (University of Kansas), Stephanie Perry Curtis (Brigham Young University), John C. Green (Bliss Institute at the University of Akron), Paul S. Herrnson (University of Maryland), Diana Kingsbury (Bliss Institute at the University of Akron), Thomas E. Mann (Brookings Institution).

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About the author

David B. Magleby is dean of the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Brigham Young University. He is the author of Financing the 2000 Election, a coeditor with Corrado of Financing the 2004 Election, and coauthor of Government by the People (Pearson Prentice Hall), now in its 21st edition.

Anthony Corrado is Professor of Government at Colby College and a nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He is a coeditor of Campaign Finance Reform: A Sourcebook and a coauthor of The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook, both published by Brookings.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Jun 1, 2011
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Pages
341
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ISBN
9780815704621
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Political Process / Campaigns & Elections
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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