Materials of the Mind: Phrenology, Race, and the Global History of Science, 1815-1920

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

Phrenology was the most popular mental science of the Victorian age. From American senators to Indian social reformers, this new mental science found supporters around the globe. Materials of the Mind tells the story of how phrenology changed the world—and how the world changed phrenology.

This is a story of skulls from the Arctic, plaster casts from Haiti, books from Bengal, and letters from the Pacific. Drawing on far-flung museum and archival collections, and addressing sources in six different languages, Materials of the Mind is an impressively innovative account of science in the nineteenth century as part of global history. It shows how the circulation of material culture underpinned the emergence of a new materialist philosophy of the mind, while also demonstrating how a global approach to history can help us reassess issues such as race, technology, and politics today.
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About the author

James Poskett is assistant professor in the history of science and technology at the University of Warwick.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Apr 26, 2019
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780226626895
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Great Britain / 20th Century
History / Europe / Great Britain / Victorian Era (1837-1901)
Science / General
Science / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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