Kim Workman: Journey Towards Justice

Bridget Williams Books
Free sample

Life is nothing more than a collection of stories – but within those stories there are threads of meaning that, over a seventy-year journey, make sense of one human life.

Kim Workman grew up in the Wairarapa, son of a Pākehā mother and Māori father. His whakapapa comes from Ngāti Kahungunu and Rangitāne; Pāpāwai Marae near Greytown is the place to which he always returns.

Jazz musician, policeman, public servant, prison manager, prominent campaigner for restorative justice – Kim’s life is full of passion and spirit, research and writing, action and commitment. His childhood was shaped by life in a country town, by family and Māori community, somewhat by school and rather more by playing jazz.

Working as a police officer in the 1960s prompted his engagement with justice reform – and brought into sharp relief the racism that he has challenged throughout his working life. His career in prison management strengthened his commitment to prisoners’ welfare.

Kim’s visionary work in justice reform began when he became director of Prison Fellowship New Zealand, and ultimately found expression in the Rethinking Crime and Punishment project and in supporting the activist group JustSpeak. His thinking draws on both his Christian faith and his Māori heritage: he was instrumental in establishing one of the first faith-based prison units, and his understanding of restorative justice draws strongly on Māori customary practice.

Journey Towards Justice is an eloquent account of a life that is at once ordinary and exceptional, told with warmth and honesty. There are dark moments and hilarious ones, achievements and failures. Above all, there is love, compassion, vision, and a profound determination to bring justice to all.

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About the author

Dr Kim Workman (of Ngāti Kahungunu and Rangitaane descent) spent nearly four decades within the public sector, with career roles within the Police, the Office of the Ombudsman, State Services Commission, Department of Maori Affairs, and Ministry of Health, including a stint as Head of the Prison Service. Kim was then Director of Prison Fellowship from 2000 until 2008. In 2006, Kim joined with Major Campbell Roberts of the Salvation Army to launch the ‘Rethinking Crime and Punishment’ strategy, and has since lent his expertise to JustSpeak as a strategic advisor and board member.

Kim is a graduate of Massey University, and has completed post-graduate study after receiving two Churchill Fellowship awards. In 2005 Kim was the joint recipient (with Jackie Katounas) of the International Prize for Restorative Justice and was made a Companion of the Queens Service Order in 2007. In 2016 he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Literature by the Victoria University Council. Kim was a Semi-finalist for the 2013 Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year Award, before going on, in 2018, to be named 2018 Metlifecare Senior New Zealander of the Year.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Dec 31, 2018
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Pages
278
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ISBN
9780947492540
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / Native American & Aboriginal
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Political Science / Political Process / Political Advocacy
Social Science / Penology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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