Cropping Systems for Sustainable Wheat Production

NSW Agriculture
Free sample

A comprehensive home study guide covering all aspects of wheat production including crop rotations, seedbed preparation and sowing, soil structure and plant growth, feeding the crop, weed control, diseases, safety, harvesting, climate and decision making, grain handling and storage.

ContentsChapter 1 Cropping systems and rotations
Chapter 2 Selecting a crop
Chapter 3 Life in the soil
Chapter 4 The plant
Chapter 5 The seedbed and sowing
Chapter 6 Soil structure and plant growth
Chapter 7 Soil water
Chapter 8 Feeding the crop
Chapter 9 Weed control
Chapter 10 Crop health
Chapter 11 Farm safety
Chapter 12 Harvesting
Chapter 13 Commonly asked questions (and answers)
Glossary
Appendix 1 Comparing yields of different cropping enterprises
Appendix 2 Climate and agriculture decision making—costs of decisions (wheat)
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Additional Information

Publisher
NSW Agriculture
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Published on
Feb 10, 2017
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Pages
152
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ISBN
9781742563305
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / Sustainable Agriculture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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