Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Near Side of the Moon

Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

In 1967, Lunar Orbiter Mission 4 sent back to Earth a superb series of photographs of the surface of the Moon, despite severe degradation caused by scanning artifacts and the reconstruction processes involved in transmission from lunar orbit.

Using 21st century techniques, Charles Byrne – previously System Engineer of the Apollo Program for Lunar Orbiter Photography – has removed the artifacts and imperfections to produce the most comprehensive and beautifully detailed set of images of the lunar surface.

The book has been organized to make it easy for astronomers to use, enabling ground-based images and views to be compared with the Orbiter photographs. The photographs are striking for their consistent Sun angles (for uniform appearance). All features have been identified with their current IAU-approved names, and each photograph has been located in terms of latitude and longitude. To help practical astronomers, all the photographs are systematically related to an Earth-based view.

Read more
Collapse

About the author

Charlie Byrne worked as a systems engineer at Bellcomm, for support of the Lunar Orbiter project. He is currently carrying out research about the Moon, and was the discoverer of the gigantic "near side megabasin" that covers nearly all of the near side of the Moon and whose ejecta has established the shape of the far side of the Moon.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Mar 17, 2010
Read more
Collapse
Pages
329
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781846281549
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Nature / Sky Observation
Science / Astronomy
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
For the experienced amateur astronomer who is wondering if there is something useful, valuable, and permanent that can be done with his or her observational skills, the answer is, "Yes, you can!" This is the book for the experienced amateur astronomer who is ready to take a new step in his or her astronomical journey. Unfortunately, there is no modern text that points curious amateur astronomers to the research possibilities that are open to them. At the 2006 meeting of the Society for Astronomical Sciences, quite a few participants agreed that the lack of such a text was a serious gap in the astronomical book market, and that this gap is impeding their efforts to encourage more amateur astronomers to get involved in research collaborations. This book will fill that gap, and enable more amateur astronomers to add research-type studies to their pursuit of the hobby.

Written by an astronomer who is well known amongst the amateur and professional community for the skill and quality of his work, this book describes a wide range of research areas where amateurs are gathering new scientific data that is utilized by professional astronomers. For each research area, the book provides a concise explanation of the purpose and value of the amateurs’ observations, a description of the equipment that is needed, specific observing procedures, complete data reduction instructions, and an explanation of how, and where, to submit results so that they will be available to the professional users.

Two books in this series, Small Astronomical Observatories, have been widely read and used. This new book by David Arditti gives the full story – how to chooseatelescope,howtoconstructanobservatoryforit,andhowtomakethe bestofitwhencompleted. Astronomyisthebestofallhobbies;itcantakeupasmuchtimeasyoulike– or as little. In any case, you will make many friends, and give yourself endless enjoyment. Tobeaproper“astronomer”youneedanobservatory,andthisbook tells you how to set about making one. Follow David Arditti’s advice, and you willnotregretit. Here’stoclearskies! PatrickMoore ix Author’sPreface Books on amateur observatories are quite rare, and most, if not all of them, in the past, have taken the form of collections of articles on particular obser- tories authored by their builders. The two books on observatories in this series already published, Small Astronomical Observatories, and More Small Ast- nomical Observatories are of this type. While useful, a danger of this approach is that it leaves gaps, and can be inconsistent in style and coverage. Discussing it with John Watson, the UK astronomy editor for Springer, we considered that it might be time for a more systematic and logical approach to be taken to the subject. Discussing it with other practical astronomers, there was also a feeling that the coverage of the subject in print had not kept pace with the technical developments that have transformed amateur astronomy, at least for some, in the last couple of decades, and that the examples in print now seemed rather old-fashioned. This book is the result of these considerations.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.