The Central Powers on the Russian Front: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives

Pen and Sword
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Arranged in five sections, one for each year of the War, this superbly illustrated book covers the fluid fighting that took place on the Russian Front from August 1914. The author describes how each year saw dramatic developments, notably actions in Poland, Tannenberg, the Carpathian passes in 1914, the 1915 operations in Galicia and the Baltic and the 1916 Brinsilov offensive. 1917 saw the collapse of the German army leading to the 1918 Treaty of Brest-Litovsk and continued fighting along the Baltic and in the Ukraine. The informative text is complemented by over 200 mainly previously unpublished photographs. The Central Powers on the Russian Front 1914 _ 1918 with its emphasis on the German Army's actions against Russia but covering operations on many fronts makes it especially valuable to those who seek greater insight into the wider conduct of The Great War away from the Western Front.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pen and Sword
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Published on
Feb 11, 2014
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Pages
208
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ISBN
9781473836297
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / World War II
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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70 years ago, on 7 June 1944, the British 7th Armored Division landed in Normandy, halfway through a wartime journey that had started in north Africa. Formed on 16 February 1940, it adopted the Jerboa as its divisional signÑand while many units that fought in the desert call themselves by the name, 7th Armoured Division are the original ÔDesert RatsÕ. The division helped destroy the Italian Tenth Army at Beda Fomm on 7 February 1941, defeat the Desert?FoxÑRommelÑat El Alamein in October 1942, and drive Axis forces out of North?Africa. After the desert, 7th Armored Division landed at Salerno on 15 September 1943, in time to help repulse concerted German counterattacks, beforeÑas part of U.S. Fifth ArmyÕs British X CorpsÑit took Naples and crossed the Volturno. Pulled out of Italy, it reached England in January 1944 where it prepared to enter the Northwestern European theater at Gold Beach from 7 June, equipped with the new Cromwell and the Sherman Firefly. The division had difficulties in Normandy, particularly at Villers-Bocage, and suffered the ignominy of having its GOCÑGeorge ErskineÑand a number of officers sacked and moved to other positions. Erskine was replaced by Gerald Lloyd Verney on 4 August 1944. He helped reinstill confidence and discipline to the division which took part in the Allied liberation of France and Belgium, entering Ghent in September. Verney was, in turn, replaced by Lewis Lyne in November 1944 and Lyne led the division on their final advance through Holland and into Germany. The Desert Rats ended the war with the liberation of Hamburg on 3 May 1945 after one of the most remarkable military journeys in history and was chosen to take part in the Allied victory parade held in Berlin on 21 July 1945. Winston Churchill recognized the achievements of the division when he spoke at the opening of a soldiersÕ club in Berlin: ÔDear Desert Rats! May your glory ever shine! May your laurels never fade! May the memory of this glorious pilgrimage of war which you have made from Alamein, via the Baltic to Berlin never die!Õ Desert Rats at War is an evocation of what it was like to serve with the division, in the African desert and Europe, from the first encounters by the Mobile Force in 1940 to Berlin in 1945. Full of eyewitness accounts and private photos, Desert Rats at War has been completely revised and updated, with additional text, maps and photographs.
Stephen E. Ambrose’s iconic New York Times bestseller about the ordinary men who became the World War II’s most extraordinary soldiers: Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, US Army.

They came together, citizen soldiers, in the summer of 1942, drawn to Airborne by the $50 monthly bonus and a desire to be better than the other guy. And at its peak—in Holland and the Ardennes—Easy Company was as good a rifle company as any in the world.

From the rigorous training in Georgia in 1942 to the disbanding in 1945, Stephen E. Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company. In combat, the reward for a job well done is the next tough assignment, and as they advanced through Europe, the men of Easy kept getting the tough assignments.

They parachuted into France early D-Day morning and knocked out a battery of four 105 mm cannon looking down Utah Beach; they parachuted into Holland during the Arnhem campaign; they were the Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne, brought in to hold the line, although surrounded, in the Battle of the Bulge; and then they spearheaded the counteroffensive. Finally, they captured Hitler's Bavarian outpost, his Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden.

They were rough-and-ready guys, battered by the Depression, mistrustful and suspicious. They drank too much French wine, looted too many German cameras and watches, and fought too often with other GIs. But in training and combat they learned selflessness and found the closest brotherhood they ever knew. They discovered that in war, men who loved life would give their lives for them.

This is the story of the men who fought, of the martinet they hated who trained them well, and of the captain they loved who led them. E Company was a company of men who went hungry, froze, and died for each other, a company that took 150 percent casualties, a company where the Purple Heart was not a medal—it was a badge of office.
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