A Chameleon from the Land of the Quagga: An Immigrant's Story

FriesenPress
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Growing up ‘European’ in 1930s and ‘40s South Africa, Joan leads a privileged life ... though marred by family tragedy. After she escapes her Victorian grandmother’s repressive upbringing to study midwifery, she comes face to face with the racial inequities of her homeland when she falls in love with Bis, a handsome young Indian doctor. Increasingly dangerous harassment and oppression force the couple to escape South Africa for London and finally small-town Canada, where Bis can run his medical practice and live as he wishes. A heartbreaking, unique, and elegantly written perspective on life under Apartheid, A CHAMELEON FROM THE LAND OF THE QUAGGA offers a deeply moving love story and a fascinating glimpse at history. This is an inspirational depiction of the life and indefatigable spirit of a woman who continually reinvents herself to conquer the challenges life throws at her no matter where she is or how dark and difficult the times.
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About the author

Joan Bismillah was born in South Africa, and after more than fifty years in Canada, she is often asked, “Where are you from? I can’t place your accent.” Blithely, she replies that it’s Transatlantic. A perpetual student, her education is widely varied, and she has lived on three continents. Though recent health issues have curtailed her golf and tennis activities, she is still an ardent devotee of music, opera, and the theatre. She indulges her passion for Bridge and enjoys the camaraderie of intelligent women at a women’s club, Verity. Living proof that age need not be a barrier to productivity, she wrote A CHAMELEON FROM THE LAND OF THE QUAGGA because she wanted the challenge and because she hopes to inspire women, young and old, to be proud of who they are and never hold back.
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Additional Information

Publisher
FriesenPress
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Published on
Apr 22, 2019
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Pages
393
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ISBN
9781525531781
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Women
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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