New Field, New Corn: Essays in Alabama Legal History

Quid Pro Books
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NEW FIELD, NEW CORN is an anthology of research papers that explore a range of topics from the rich legal history of the state of Alabama and its influential legal and judicial figures. Contemporary photography and maps are featured as well. 

New Field, New Corn presents eight new essays on Alabama legal history from the pre-Civil War era through the Civil Rights era. These elegant and novel chapters survey a broad spectrum, from economics, race, education, and professional concerns of lawyers, to plain old legal doctrine, to show how those variables affected the state’s development. These essays reveal why we need intensive studies of American law at the state and county level in the 19th and 20th centuries. For they demonstrate that law is embedded in our culture. These invite many other studies, from the county level on up, in other states, to demonstrate how law lies at the center of nation’s history. They reaffirm my faith that there are many, many fascinating stories left to tell about our nation’s journey towards fulfilling the promises of law.”
— Alfred L. Brophy
Judge John J. Parker Distinguished Professor of Law
University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
Author, Reparations: Pro and Con (2006) and Reconstructing the Dreamland (2002) 

“Alabama legal history can be surprising. Usually, this history is identified with dominant one-party politics, slavery, racial segregation, and limited social welfare. University of Alabama Law School legal historian Paul Pruitt’s collection of young lawyers’ research reveals a new field. It extends out from legal subjects, embracing new perceptions of law in society across Alabama history. The collection rests on broad research. Lawyers working in diverse fields have produced Alabama legal history that sets a new standard.”
— Tony Freyer
University Research Professor of History and Law, Emeritus
University of Alabama
Author, Hugo L. Black and the Dilemma of American Liberalism (2007), and coauthor, Democracy and Judicial Independence (1996)

The volume’s contents include:

• Bryan K. Fair’s Foreword: “Critiquing Our Present, Interrogating Our Past”

• Paul M. Pruitt, Jr.’s Introduction: “Alabama Legal History as a Field of Study”

• Warren Hoffman: “Developments of the Enclosure Movement in Alabama: Disrupting the Free Roaming”

• Paul Rand: “Flush Times in the Chancery: A Brief Note on the History of Equity and Trusts”

• Helen Eckinger: “The Militarization of the University of Alabama”

• Eddie Lowe: “Economic Growth in Blount County/Onteonta: Attorneys, Companies, and Cases”

• Mike Dodson: “Pioneers in Alabama Legal History: A Firm Understanding of the History of Alabama”

• Courtney Cooper: “A Man in a Boy’s Coat: The Evolution of Alabama’s Constitutions”

• Deirdra Drinkard: “The Uniform Beneath the Robe”

• Ellie Campbell: “The ‘Breakthrough Verdict’: Strange v. State

A compelling new addition to the Legal History & Biography Series from Quid Pro Books.

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About the author

Paul M. Pruitt, Jr. is a senior law librarian at the University of Alabama School of Law and the author of the book Taming Alabama: Lawyers and Reformers, 1804-1929.  He holds advanced degrees in library sciences and history, including his PhD in History from William & Mary.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Sep 9, 2015
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Pages
202
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ISBN
9781610273107
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 21st Century
History / United States / State & Local / South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV)
Law / Essays
Law / Legal History
Law / Legal Profession
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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