Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs: 2003

Brookings Institution Press
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Designed to reach a wide audience of scholars and policymakers, this series contains studies on urban sprawl, crime, taxes, education, poverty, and related subjects. "This journal will set the tone for urban economics for the coming decades. It will play a major role not only in academia, but also in ensuring that we have better urban economic policy." - George Akerlof, University of California, Berkeley Contents include: The Geography of Inequality in the United States 1950-2000 Douglas S. Massey and Mary J. Fischer (University of Pennsylvania) Getting Inside Accountability: Lessons from Chicago Brian A. Jacob (Kennedy School of Government) School Accountability Ratings and Housing Values Thomas J. Kane, Douglas O. Staiger, and Gavin Samms Public School Finance and Urban School Policy: General vs Partial Equilibrium Analysis Thomas Nechyba Catching Cheating Teachers: The Results of an Unusual Experiment in Implementing Theory Brian A. Jacob and Steven D. Levitt Local Variation in Land Use Regulations Bengte Evenson and William C. Wheaton
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About the author

William G. Gale is a vice president and director of the Brookings Institution's Economic Studies program, where he holds the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy. He is also founding codirector of the Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute. Janet Rothenberg Pack is professor of business and public policy and real estate at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Dec 1, 2010
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Pages
278
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ISBN
9780815707011
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Urban & Regional
Political Science / Public Policy / City Planning & Urban Development
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Designed to reach a wide audience of scholars and policymakers, this new series contains studies on urban sprawl, crime, taxes, education, poverty, and related subjects. "This journal will set the tone for urban economics for the coming decades. It will play a major role not only in academia, but also in ensuring that we have better urban economic policy." —George Akerlof, University of California, Berkeley Contents of the third issue include: "Local Government Fiscal Structure and Metropolitan Consolidation" Dennis Epple (Carnegie-Mellon University), Stephen Calabrese (University of South Florida), and Glenn Cassidy Should the Suburbs Help Finance Central City Public Services? Andrew Haughwout (Federal Reserve Bank of NY) and Robert Inman (University of Pennsylvania) "Tax Incentives and the City" Therese McGuire (UCLA) and Teresa Garcia-Mila (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) "Does Gentrification Harm the Poor?" Jacob Vigdor (Duke University) "Corruption in Cities: Graft and Politics in American Cities at the Turn of the Twentieth Century" Rebecca Menes (George Mason University) "Immigrant Children and Urban Schools: Lessons from New York on Segregation, Resources and School Attendance Patterns" Ingrid Gould Ellen, Katherine O'Regan, Amy Ellen Schwartz, and Leanna Stiefel (New York University) William G. Gale is the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy in the Economic Studies program at the Brookings Institution. Janet Roterber Pack is professor public policy and management and real estate at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.
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