Warranting Assent: Case Studies in Argument Evaluation

SUNY Press
Free sample

This book brings together essays that demonstrate the art of argument evaluation. The essays apply a variety of theoretical approaches to specific, historically-situated arguments in order to render a specific normative judgment. By bringing to bear knowledge of argumentation theory along with expertise pertaining to the specific arguments under investigation, this book illustrates the utility of argument evaluation as a discrete mode of scholarly engagement.
Read more

About the author

Edward Schiappa is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Communication at Purdue University. He is the author of Protagoras and Logos: A Study in Greek Philosophy and Rhetoric and the editor of Landmark Essays on Classical Greek Rhetoric.

Read more

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
Read more
Pages
330
Read more
ISBN
9781438418926
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Philosophy / Movements / Phenomenology
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Edward Schiappa
Argues that representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work that films and television shows can perform in reducing prejudice.Representational correctness describes an implicit set of norms, including accuracy, purity, and innocence, that guide much of popular media criticism. In this provocative book, Edward Schiappa argues that representational correctness is unproductive, antagonistic to audience research, and typically disconnected from relevant social psychological or mass communication theories. Analyzing criticisms of such television shows as Will & Grace andQueer Eye for the Straight Guy, Schiappa argues that the norms of representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work such shows perform in reducing prejudice. He contends that too many critics focus on isolated scenes or interactions that perpetuate a stereotype without considering the larger work that films and television shows can accomplish. Schiappa concludes that pop culture critics need to engage in more audience research, draw from relevant research in social psychology, praise positive representations and programming, and promote critical media literacy in both classroom and public pedagogy.

“Whether or not you agree with Edward Schiappa’s central argument that media studies should move toward multimethodological approaches that incorporate social science measures into audience analysis to broaden its scope, it is difficult to deny that conventional textual analysis has sometimes been limited by problems related to representational correctness. Schiappa raises important questions for critical media studies and offers provocative answers.” — Mary M. Dalton, coeditor of The Sitcom Reader: America Viewed and Skewed
Edward Schiappa
Argues that representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work that films and television shows can perform in reducing prejudice.

Representational correctness describes an implicit set of norms, including accuracy, purity, and innocence, that guide much of popular media criticism. In this provocative book, Edward Schiappa argues that representational correctness is unproductive, antagonistic to audience research, and typically disconnected from relevant social psychological or mass communication theories. Analyzing criticisms of such television shows as Will & Grace andQueer Eye for the Straight Guy, Schiappa argues that the norms of representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work such shows perform in reducing prejudice. He contends that too many critics focus on isolated scenes or interactions that perpetuate a stereotype without considering the larger work that films and television shows can accomplish. Schiappa concludes that pop culture critics need to engage in more audience research, draw from relevant research in social psychology, praise positive representations and programming, and promote critical media literacy in both classroom and public pedagogy.

“Whether or not you agree with Edward Schiappa’s central argument that media studies should move toward multimethodological approaches that incorporate social science measures into audience analysis to broaden its scope, it is difficult to deny that conventional textual analysis has sometimes been limited by problems related to representational correctness. Schiappa raises important questions for critical media studies and offers provocative answers.” — Mary M. Dalton, coeditor of The Sitcom Reader: America Viewed and Skewed
Edward Schiappa
Protagoras and Logos brings together in a meaningful synthesis the contributions and rhetoric of the first and most famous of the Older Sophists, Protagoras of Abdera. Most accounts of Protagoras rely on the somewhat hostile reports of Plato and Aristotle. By focusing on Protagoras's own surviving words, this study corrects many long-standing misinterpretations and presents significant facts: Protagoras was a first-rate philosophical thinker who positively influenced the theories of Plato and Aristotle, and Protagoras pioneered the study of language and was the first theorist of rhetoric. In addition to illustrating valuable methods of translating and reading fifth-century B.C.E. Greek passages, the book marshals evidence for the important philological conclusion that the Greek word translated as rhetoric was a coinage by Plato in the early fourth century. In this second edition, Edward Schiappa reassesses the philosophical and pedagogical contributions of Protagoras. Schiappa argues that traditional accounts of Protagoras are hampered by mistaken assumptions about the Sophists and the teaching of the art of rhetoric in the fifth century. He shows that, contrary to tradition, the so-called Older Sophists investigated and taught the skills of logos, which is closer to modern conceptions of critical reasoning than of persuasive oratory. Schiappa also offers interpretations for each of Protagoras's major surviving fragments and examines Protagoras's contributions to the theory and practice of Greek education, politics, and philosophy. In a new afterword Schiappa addresses historiographical issues that have occupied scholars in rhetorical studies over the past ten years, and throughout the study he provides references to scholarship from the last decade that has refined his views on Protagoras and other Sophists.
Edward Schiappa
Argues that representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work that films and television shows can perform in reducing prejudice.

Representational correctness describes an implicit set of norms, including accuracy, purity, and innocence, that guide much of popular media criticism. In this provocative book, Edward Schiappa argues that representational correctness is unproductive, antagonistic to audience research, and typically disconnected from relevant social psychological or mass communication theories. Analyzing criticisms of such television shows as Will & Grace andQueer Eye for the Straight Guy, Schiappa argues that the norms of representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work such shows perform in reducing prejudice. He contends that too many critics focus on isolated scenes or interactions that perpetuate a stereotype without considering the larger work that films and television shows can accomplish. Schiappa concludes that pop culture critics need to engage in more audience research, draw from relevant research in social psychology, praise positive representations and programming, and promote critical media literacy in both classroom and public pedagogy.

“Whether or not you agree with Edward Schiappa’s central argument that media studies should move toward multimethodological approaches that incorporate social science measures into audience analysis to broaden its scope, it is difficult to deny that conventional textual analysis has sometimes been limited by problems related to representational correctness. Schiappa raises important questions for critical media studies and offers provocative answers.” — Mary M. Dalton, coeditor of The Sitcom Reader: America Viewed and Skewed
Edward Schiappa
Argues that representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work that films and television shows can perform in reducing prejudice.Representational correctness describes an implicit set of norms, including accuracy, purity, and innocence, that guide much of popular media criticism. In this provocative book, Edward Schiappa argues that representational correctness is unproductive, antagonistic to audience research, and typically disconnected from relevant social psychological or mass communication theories. Analyzing criticisms of such television shows as Will & Grace andQueer Eye for the Straight Guy, Schiappa argues that the norms of representational correctness can cause critics to miss the positive work such shows perform in reducing prejudice. He contends that too many critics focus on isolated scenes or interactions that perpetuate a stereotype without considering the larger work that films and television shows can accomplish. Schiappa concludes that pop culture critics need to engage in more audience research, draw from relevant research in social psychology, praise positive representations and programming, and promote critical media literacy in both classroom and public pedagogy.

“Whether or not you agree with Edward Schiappa’s central argument that media studies should move toward multimethodological approaches that incorporate social science measures into audience analysis to broaden its scope, it is difficult to deny that conventional textual analysis has sometimes been limited by problems related to representational correctness. Schiappa raises important questions for critical media studies and offers provocative answers.” — Mary M. Dalton, coeditor of The Sitcom Reader: America Viewed and Skewed
©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.