The Enigma of Good and Evil: The Moral Sentiment in Literature

Analecta Husserliana

Book 85
Springer Science & Business Media
4
Free sample

Striking toward peace and harmony the human being is ceasely torn apart in personal, social, national life by wars feuds, inequities and intimate personal conflicts for which there seems to be no respite. Does the human condition in interaction with others imply a constant adversity? Or, is this conflict owing to an interior or external factor of evil governing our attitudes and conduct toward the other person? To what criteria should I refer for appreciation, judgment, direction concerning my attitudes and my actions as they bear on the well-being of others?

At the roots of these questions lies human experience which ought to be appropriately clarified before entering into speculative abstractions of the ethical theories and precepts. Literature, which in its very gist, dwells upon disentangling in multiple perspective the peripeteia of our life-experience offers us a unique field of source-material for moral and ethical investigations.

Literature brings preeminently to light the Moral Sentiment which pervades our life with others -- our existence tout court. Being modulated through the course of our experiences the Moral Sentiment sustains the very sense of literature and of personal human life (Tymieniecka).

Papers by:
Tony E. Afejuku, Alira Ashvo-Munoz, Gary Backhaus, Alain Beaulieu, M. Avelina Cecilia Lafuente, Predrag Cicovacki, Dorothy G. Clark, Jerre Collins, Michael D. Daniels, Michel Dion, Tsung-I Dow, William Edelglass, Richard Findler, Jorge Garcia-Gomez, Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei, Andrew Jones-Cathcart, Lawrence Kimmel, Ken Kirby, Marlies Kronegger, Megan Laverty, Lew Livesay, Annika Ljung- Baruth, Bernard Micallef, Rebecca M. Painter, Bernadette Prochaska, Sitansu Ray, Valerie Reed, Victor Gerald Rivas, Kristine S. Santilli, Christopher Schreiner, Jadwiga Smith, Max Statkiewicz, George R. Tibbetts, Rosaria Trovato, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, Peter Weigel, Raymond J. Wilson III, John Zbikowski.

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About the author

Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka was born in Marianowo, Poland on February 28, 1923. She studied at the University of Krakow, the Sorbonne, and the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, where she received a Ph.D. in philosophy. She was the founder and president the World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning. She was the author of 14 books and the editor of Analecta Husserliana: The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research and Phenomenological Inquiry: A Review of Philosophical Ideas and Trends. She died on June 7, 2014 at the age of 91.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Aug 27, 2006
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Pages
880
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ISBN
9781402035760
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / General
Literary Criticism / General
Philosophy / Aesthetics
Philosophy / Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Philosophy / Mind & Body
Philosophy / Movements / Phenomenology
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This content is DRM protected.
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Temporality pervades all the dynamic joint of existence, and the human being as such. As human beings unfold through ontopoiesis, each move of which punctuates the temporality of life, they, whose life experience, deliberation, planning, reflection and dreaming are permeated by temporal motivations and concerns, feel that they are engaged in the spinning of a common thread. Attributing to that involvement universal laws, constant existential validity and power, they absolutise/hypostasise its rule as a cosmic/human factor: “time”.

Yet today technologies are transforming the temporality of our existence by accelerating, intensifying, expanding our partaking in the world of life. Human communal and social involvement is being challenged in its personal significance to the core of our being.

What happens to “time”?

A basic reinvestigation of the nature of temporality is called for.

Human creative endeavor – especially literature – may initiate it. Having the human subject – the creator – at its center, literature is essentially engaged in temporality whether that of the mind or of the world of life through the creative process of writing, stage directing, or the reader’s and viewer’s reception.

Out of the cross-motivations that the creative mind filters in its temporal synthesis in touch with all the perspectives of existence, there surges the deepest significance of life in humanity and culture. But, first of all, life comes to light as timing itself in its logos.(Tymieniecka)

Papers by:
A-T. Tymieniecka, A. Ashvo-Munoz, A. Omrani, R. Gray, T.E. Afejuku, M.-Q. Ma, W.S. Smith, J.S. Smith, V. Kocay, I. Okhamafe, P. Mroz, T. Despotovic, M. Dion, R.M. Painter, V.G. Rivas, W. O’Brien, J. Kim-Reuter, A. Zacharz, L. Kimmel, J. Handerek, M. Durante, V. Reed, M. Statkiewicz, D. Doyle, J. Collins, L. Livesay, R.J. Wilson III.

The human being is today at the center of scientific, social, ethical and philosophical debates.

The Human Condition-in-the-unity-of-everything-there-is-alive, under whose aegis the present selection of essays falls, offers the urgently needed new approach to reinvestigating humanness. While recent advances in the neurosciences, genetics and bio-engineering challenge the traditional abstract conception of "human nature", indicating its transformability, thus putting in question the main tenets of traditional philosophical anthropology, in the new perspective of the Human Creative Condition the human individual is seen in its emergence and unfolding within the dynamic networks of the logos of life, and within the evolution of living types. Just the same, the creative logos of the mind lifts the human person into a sphere of freedom. Within the networks of the logos we retrieve the classical principles – human subject, ego, self, body, soul, person – reinterpret them to counter the naturalistic critique (Tymieniecka).

Thus principles of a new philosophical anthropology satisfying the requirements of the present time are laid down.

Papers by:
Tristan Ace, Michael F. Andrews, Ann Astell, Stella Zita De Azevedo, Carmen Balzer, Angela Ales Bello, Andreas Brenner, Carmen Cozma, Agnes B. Curry, Roberta de Monticelli, Eddo Evink, Maria Golebiewska, Laura Hengehold, Kadria Ismail, Marzenna Jakubczak, Maria Mercede Ligozzi, Maria Manuela Brito Martins, Piotr Mroz, Martin Nkafu Nkemnkia, Maria Teresa de Noronha, Peter Reynaert, Victor Gerald Rivas, Mobeen Shahid, Olena Shkubulyani, Michael Staudigl, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, Willem Van Groenou.

Temporality pervades all the dynamic joint of existence, and the human being as such. As human beings unfold through ontopoiesis, each move of which punctuates the temporality of life, they, whose life experience, deliberation, planning, reflection and dreaming are permeated by temporal motivations and concerns, feel that they are engaged in the spinning of a common thread. Attributing to that involvement universal laws, constant existential validity and power, they absolutise/hypostasise its rule as a cosmic/human factor: “time”.

Yet today technologies are transforming the temporality of our existence by accelerating, intensifying, expanding our partaking in the world of life. Human communal and social involvement is being challenged in its personal significance to the core of our being.

What happens to “time”?

A basic reinvestigation of the nature of temporality is called for.

Human creative endeavor – especially literature – may initiate it. Having the human subject – the creator – at its center, literature is essentially engaged in temporality whether that of the mind or of the world of life through the creative process of writing, stage directing, or the reader’s and viewer’s reception.

Out of the cross-motivations that the creative mind filters in its temporal synthesis in touch with all the perspectives of existence, there surges the deepest significance of life in humanity and culture. But, first of all, life comes to light as timing itself in its logos.(Tymieniecka)

Papers by:
A-T. Tymieniecka, A. Ashvo-Munoz, A. Omrani, R. Gray, T.E. Afejuku, M.-Q. Ma, W.S. Smith, J.S. Smith, V. Kocay, I. Okhamafe, P. Mroz, T. Despotovic, M. Dion, R.M. Painter, V.G. Rivas, W. O’Brien, J. Kim-Reuter, A. Zacharz, L. Kimmel, J. Handerek, M. Durante, V. Reed, M. Statkiewicz, D. Doyle, J. Collins, L. Livesay, R.J. Wilson III.

Antifragile is a standalone book in Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s landmark Incerto series, an investigation of opacity, luck, uncertainty, probability, human error, risk, and decision-making in a world we don’t understand. The other books in the series are Fooled by Randomness, The Black Swan, Skin in the Game, and The Bed of Procrustes.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost thinkers of our time, reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world.

Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls “antifragile” is that category of things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish. 

In The Black Swan, Taleb showed us that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. In Antifragile, Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better.

Furthermore, the antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events. Why is the city-state better than the nation-state, why is debt bad for you, and why is what we call “efficient” not efficient at all? Why do government responses and social policies protect the strong and hurt the weak? Why should you write your resignation letter before even starting on the job? How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives? The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems, and medicine. And throughout, in addition to the street wisdom of Fat Tony of Brooklyn, the voices and recipes of ancient wisdom, from Roman, Greek, Semitic, and medieval sources, are loud and clear.

Antifragile is a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world.

Erudite, witty, and iconoclastic, Taleb’s message is revolutionary: The antifragile, and only the antifragile, will make it.

Praise for Antifragile

“Ambitious and thought-provoking . . . highly entertaining.”—The Economist

“A bold book explaining how and why we should embrace uncertainty, randomness, and error . . . It may just change our lives.”—Newsweek
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