The Miracle Braves of 1914

The SABR Digital Library

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Long
before the Red Sox "Impossible Dream" season, Boston’s
now nearly forgotten “other” team, the 1914 Boston Braves,
performed a baseball “miracle” that resounds to this very day.
The "Miracle Braves" were Boston's first "worst-to-first"
winners of the World Series.





Shortly
after the turn of the previous century, the once mighty Braves had
become a perennial member of the National League’s second division.
Preseason pundits didn't believe the 1914 team posed a meaningful
threat to John McGraw’s powerful New York Giants. During the first
half of that campaign, Boston lived down to such expectations, taking
up residence in the league’s basement.





Refusing
to throw in the towel at the midseason mark, their leader, the
pugnacious George Stallings, deftly manipulated his daily lineup and
pitching staff to engineer a remarkable second-half climb in the
standings all the way to first place. The team’s winning momentum
carried into the postseason, where the Braves swept Connie Mack's
heralded Athletics and claimed the only World Championship ever won
by Boston’s National League entry. And for 100 years, the
management, players, and fans of underperforming ball clubs have
turned to the Miracle Braves to catch a glimmer of hope that such a
midseason turnaround could be repeated.





Through
the collaborative efforts of a band of dedicated members of the
Society for American Baseball Research, this benchmark accomplishment
is richly revealed to the reader in
The
Miracle Braves of 1914: Boston's Original Worst-to-First World Series
Champions.
The essence
of the “miracle” is captured through a comprehensive compendium
of incisive biographies of the players and other figures associated
with the team, with additional relevant research pieces on the
season. After a journey through the pages of this book, the die-hard
baseball fan will better understand why the call to “Wait Until
Next Year” should never be voiced prematurely.





Includes:


FOREWORD
by Bob Brady


THE
BRAVES


Ted
Cather by Jack V. Morris


Gene
Cocreham by Thomas Ayers


Wilson
Collins by Charlie Weatherby


Joe
Connolly by Dennis Auger


Ensign
Cottrell by Peter Cottrell


Dick
Crutcher by Jerrod Cotosman


George
Davis by Rory Costello


Charlie
Deal by Charles F. Faber


Josh
Devore by Peter Gordon


Oscar
Dugey by Charlie Weatherby


Johnny
Evers by David Shiner


The
1914 Evers-Zimmerman Incident 
and How the Tale Grew Taller Over

the Years by Bob Brady


The
Evers Ejection Record by 
Mark Sternman


Larry
Gilbert by Jack V. Morris


Hank
Gowdy by Carol McMains and Frank Ceresi


Tommy
Griffith by Chip Greene


Otto
Hess by Gary Hess


Tom
Hughes by Greg Erion


Bill
James by David Jones


Clarence
Kraft by Jon Dunkle


Dolf
Luque by Peter Bjarkman


Les
Mann by Maurice Bouchard


Rabbit
Maranville by Dick Leyden


Billy
Martin by Bob Joel


Jack
Martin by Charles F. Faber


Herbie
Moran by Charles F. Faber


Jim
Murray by Jim Elfers


Hub
Perdue by John Simpson


Dick
Rudolph by Dick Leyden


Butch
Schmidt by Chip Greene


Red
Smith by Charles F. Faber


Paul
Strand by Jack V. Morris


Fred
Tyler by John Shannahan


Lefty
Tyler by Wayne McElreavy


Bert
Whaling by Charles F. Faber


George
“Possum” Whitted by Craig Hardee


MANAGER


George
Stallings by Martin Kohout


COACH


Fred
Mitchell by Bill Nowlin


OWNER


Jim
Gaffney by Rory Costello


The
Braves’ A.B.C. by Ring Lardner


1914
Boston Braves Timeline by Mike Lynch


A
Stallings Anecdote


1914
World Series by Mark Sternman


I
Told You So” by O.R.C.


The
Rest of 1914 by Mike Lynch


How
An Exhibition Game Contributed To A Miracle by Bob Brady


The
National League Pennant Race of 1914 by Frank Vaccaro


The
Press, The Fans, and the 1914 Boston Braves by Donna L. Halper


Return
of the Miracle Braves by Bob Brady


Miracle
Teams by A Comparison of the 1914 Miracle Braves and 1969 Miracle
Mets by Tom Nahigian


An
Unexpected Farewell by The South End Grounds, August 1914 by Bob
Ruzzo


The
Time(s) the Braves Played Home Games at Fenway Park by Bill Nowlin


The
Kisselkar Sign


The
Trail Blazers in Indian File by R. E. M. - poems for 1914 Braves,
collected by Joanne Hulbert


The
Story of the 1914 Braves by George Stallings


Mr.
Warmth” and “Very Superstitious” – two George Stallings
anecdotes by Bob Brady


By
the Numbers by Dan Fields


Creature
Feature by Dan Fields




 

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About the author

 SABR is the Society for American Baseball Research, a group of over 6,000 enthusiasts about the game of baseball whose research interests range from the game's history to statistical analysis, records, cultural impact, and more. The BioProject is a SABR effort to research, write, and publish biographies of every player--and every person--ever connected with organized baseball. Anyone with a love of baseball can join SABR and become a part of these efforts.

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
SABR, Inc.
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Published on
Apr 2, 2014
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Pages
398
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ISBN
9781933599700
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Language
English
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Genres
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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"You talk about destiny, well, you
can't rule that out. We were hard-nosed and that showed up in 1957."
-- Braves catcher Del Crandall to editor Gregory H. Wolf





Few teams in baseball history have
captured the hearts of their fans like the Milwaukee Braves of the
19505. During the Braves' 13-year tenure in Milwaukee (1953-1965),
they had a winning record every season, won two consecutive NL
pennants (1957 and 1958), lost two more in the final week of the
season (1956 and 1959), and set big-league attendance records along
the way.





This book celebrates the Milwaukee
Braves' historic 1957 World Series championship season. Led by the
bats of National League Most Valuable Player Henry Aaron and slugging
third baseman Eddie Mathews and the "Big Three" pitching
trio (Cy Young Award winner Warren Spahn, Lew Burdette, and Bob Buhl)
the Braves won 95 games. The team enjoyed standout seasons by
shortstop Johnny Logan, outfielder Wes Covington, and catcher Del
Crandall And GM John Quinn pulled off the biggest trade of the
summer, acquiring All-Star second baseman Red Schoendienst from the
New York Giants. The Braves cemented their place in history by
defeating the New York Yankees in the World Series. In one of the
greatest performances in the history of the fall classic, crafty Lew
Burdette tossed his second consecutive shutout (and third complete
game) to defeat the Bronx Bombers in Game Seven, in Yankee Stadium.





A collaborative effort of 32 members of
the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), Thar's Joy in
Braveland! The 1957 Milwaukee Braves portrays that memorable team
with life stories of all of the roster players, the manager and
coaching staff, the owner, the general manager, and sportswriters and
radio announcers. Summaries of the regular season and World Series
re-create the magic of that unforgettable season.





Table of Contents:


Introduction:The
Milwaukee Braves Make History by Gregory H Wolf


From
Yawkey to Milwaukee: Lou Perini Makes his Move by Saul Wisnia






THE
BRAVES


Henry
“Hank” Aaron by William Johnson


Joe Adcock by
Gregory H Wolf


Bill Bruton by
John Harry Stahl


Bob Buhl by
Gregory H Wolf


Lew
Burdette by Alex Kupfer


Dick
Cole by Doug Engleman


Gene
Conley by John R Husman


Wes
Covington by Andy Sturgill


Del
Crandall by Gregory H Wolf


Ray
Crone by Gregory H Wolf


John
DeMerit by Steven Schmitt


Harry
Hanebrink by Andy Sturgill


Bob
Hazle by Nancy Snell Griffith


Joey
Jay by Joe Wancho


Ernie
Johnson by Dana Sprague


Dave
Jolly by Chip Greene


Nippy
Jones by Dan Fields


Johnny
Logan by Bob Buege


Bobby
Malkmus by Gregory H Wolf


Felix
Mantilla by Rick Schabowski


Eddie
Mathews by David Fleitz


Don
McMahon by John Vorperian


Red
Murff by Michael J Bielawa


Danny
O’Connell by Mel Marmer


Andy
Pafko by Dale Voiss


Phil
Paine by Chip Greene


Taylor
Phillips by Rick Schabowski


Juan
Pizarro by Rory Costello


Del
Rice by Norm King


Mel
Roach by David Fleitz


Carl
Sawatski by Gregory H Wolf


Red
Schoendienst by Kristen Lokemoen


Ray
Shearer by William Johnson


Warren
Spahn by Jim Kaplan


Chuck
Tanner by Dan Fields


Hawk
Taylor by Steven Schmitt


Bobby
Thomson by Jeff Findley


Frank
Torre by Norm King


Bob
Trowbridge by Nancy Snell Griffith






THE
MANAGER


Fred
Haney by Jim Gordon






THE
COACHES


Bob
Keely by Gregory H Wolf


Johnny
Riddle by Nancy Snell Griffith


Charlie
Root by Gregory H Wolf


Connie
Ryan by John McMurray






GENERAL
MANAGER


John
Quinn by Rory Costello






County
Stadium by Gregg Hoffmann


Jane
Jarvis by Rory Costello






THE
SPORTSWRITERS


Headlines
and Deadlines: Wordsmiths of the Braves by Bob Buege


Lou
Chapman by Bob Buege


Red
Thisted by Bob Buege


Bob
Wolf by Bob Buege






RADIO
ANNOUNCERS


Voices
of the Braves: Blaine Walsh and Earl Gillespie by Bob Buege






REGULAR
SEASON SUMMARY


The
Milwaukee Braves Season Timeline and Summary by Gregory H Wolf






WORLD
SERIES SUMMARY


World
Series Summary by Norm King






By
the Numbers: Milwaukee Braves in 1957 by Dan Fields


Thirteen
Years of Magic by Bob Buege

 

It had taken three and a half decades, but the Detroit Tigers were finally crowned the best team in baseball in 1935. Coming on the heels of their hugely disappointing loss in the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals the year before, the Tigers emerged victorious in a thrilling six-game October showdown against a talented Chicago Cubs team. 


It was Detroit's first World Series championship. For a city suffering from the Great Depression, it couldn't have come at a better time. 


The team was led by player-manager Mickey Cochrane, and featured an offense fueled by Hank Greenberg, Charlie Gehringer, and Goose Goslin (dubber the "G-Men"). On the mound were Lynwood Thomas "Schoolboy" Rowe, Tommy Bridges, Elden Auker, and General Crowder. With 93 victories that summer, the Tigers outpaced the New York Yankees by three games, taking their fifth American League title in club history. 


To commemorate the 80th anniversary of this great team, the Society for American Baseball Research is proud to present the 1935 Detroit Tigers in all their glory. With contributions from over 35 members of the SABR BioProject, this book is a delightful account of one of the most significant teams in sports history. 


"Navin Field was packed, and when we won Detroit really came alive. As a team we were like a bunch of brothers. Hank, Charlie, Billy, Goose, Schoolboy, Tommy...all of them. I think of those guys often. It was a wonderful time of my life." -Elden Auker


Contents:

Introduction by Scott Ferkovich

Sleeping Giant: Detroit in the 1930s by Gary Gillette

The Babe’s Loss Was Detroit’s Gain: The Cochrane Trade by John Milner

The 1935 Season in Review by Greg Erion 

THE OWNER: Frank Navin by Marc Okkonen & David Jones 

THE PLAYERS

Elden Auker by Robert H. Schaefer 

Tommy Bridges by Rob Neyer

Flea Clifton by Kent Ailsworth 

Mickey Cochrane by Charles Bevis  

General Crowder by Gregory H. Wolf

Carl Fischer by Jeff Bower 

Pete Fox by Gerald Nechal 

Charlie Gehringer by Ruth Sadler 

Goose Goslin by Cort Vitty 

Hank Greenberg by Scott Ferkovich 

Clyde Hatter by Frank Schaffer 

Ray Hayworth by Chuck Ailsworth

Chief Hogsett by Rory Costello 

Roxie Lawson by Alan Cohen 

Firpo Marberry by Mark Armour 

Chet Morgan by Greg Erion 

Marv Owen by Mark Armour 

Frank Reiber by Gregg Omoth 

Billy Rogell by Raymond Buzenski

Schoolboy Rowe by Gregory H. Wolf

Heinie Schuble by Rodney Johnson 

Hugh Shelley by Scott Dominiak 

Vic Sorrell by Gregory H. Wolf 

Joe Sullivan by Gregory H. Wolf 

Gee Walker by David Raglin 

Hub Walker by Gregory H. Wolf

Jo-Jo White by Kent Ailsworth

THE COACHES
Del Baker by Rob Neyer

Cy Perkins by C. Paul Rogers III

The Corner of Michigan and Trumbull by Scott Ferkovich

By the Numbers by Dan Fields

“Good Afternoon, Boys and Girls”: The Tigers on the Radio in 1935 by Matthew Bohn

A Mechanical Man, a Hammer, a Goose, and Black Mike: The 1935 Tigers in the Hall of Fame by Doug Lehman

July 8, 1935: American League All-Stars 4, National League All-Stars 1 by Chuck Ailsworth

Detroit: “City of Champions” by Larry & Rob Hilliard

World Series Opponents:The 1935 Chicago Cubs by Gregory H. Wolf 

“I Thought I Never Would Get There”: The 1935 World Series by Scott Ferkovich


 Calling the Game: Baseball Broadcasting from 1920 to the Present is an exhaustive, meticulously researched history of bringing the national pastime out of the ballparks and into living rooms via the airwaves. 


Every play-by-play announcer, color commentator, and ex-ballplayer who has presented a Major League Baseball game to the public is included here. So is every broadcast deal, radio station, and TV network. In addition to chapters for each of the game's thirty franchises, a history of national broadcasting and a look at some of the game's most memorable national broadcast moments are included, as are a foreword by "Voice of the Chicago Cubs" Pat Hughes, and an afterword by Jacques Doucet, the "Voice of the Montreal Expos, 1972-2004." 


Each team chapter presents a chronological look from how and when the team began broadcasting (since all of the original sixteen major-league franchises predate radio) through the 2014 season. Author Stuart Shea details the history and strategies that shaped each club's broadcast crews, including the highlights and scandals, the hirings and firings, the sponsorships and corporate maneuverings. From the leap to Brooklyn from the radio booth of the Atlanta Crackers by young Ernie Harwell, to the dismissal of Mel Allen by the Yankees, from the tutelage of the now-legendary Vin Scully under the wing of the already legendary Red Barber, to the ascendance of the great Jack Buck to the number one chair in St. Louis upon the ouster of Harry Caray, the stories of the personalities who connect us to the game are all here. 


Calling the Game is a groundbreaking and illuminating look at the people and the story behind the soundtrack of summer for millions of baseball fans.



This is a book about baseball’s true “replacement players.”


During the four seasons the U.S. was at war in World War II (1942-1945), 533 players made their major-league debuts. There were 67 first-time major leaguers under the age of 21 (Joe Nuxhall the youngest at 15 in 1944). More than 60 percent of the players in the 1941 Opening Day lineups departed for the service. The 1944 Dodgers had only Dixie Walker and Mickey Owen as the two regulars from their 1941 pennant-winning team.


The owners brought in not only first-timers but also many oldsters. Hod Lisenbee pitched 80 innings for the Reds in 1945 at the age of 46. He had last pitched in the major leagues in 1936. War veteran and former POW Bert Shepard, with an artificial leg, pitched in one game for the 1945 Senators, and one-armed outfielder Pete Gray played for the St. Louis Browns.


The war years featured firsts and lasts. The St. Louis Browns won their first (and last) pennant in 1944 — a feat made more amazing by the fact that they had not finished in the first division since 1929. The 1944 team featured 13 players classified as 4-F. The Chicago Cubs appeared in the 1945 World Series but have not made it back since.


Some 53 members of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) have contributed to this volume. We invite you to sit back and relax as you learn Who's on First?


Includes contributions by: Alan Cohen, Ashlie Christian And Armand Peterson, Bill Nowlin, Bob Brady, Bob Lemoine, Bob Mayer, Bob Webster, Charles Faber, Charlie Weatherby, Chris Rainey, Cort Vitty, David Finoli, David M. Jordan, David Raglin And Barb Mantegani, David W. Pugh, Don Zminda, Duke Goldman, Greg Erion, Gregg Omoth, Gregory H. Wolf, J. G. Preston, James D. Smith, Iii, Jay Hurd, Jeff Marlett, Jeff Obermeyer, Jim Sweetman, Joanne Hulbert, John Shannahan, Leslie Heaphy, Lyle Spatz, Marc Lancaster, Marc Z Aaron, Mark S. Sternman, Mel Marmer, Merrie A. Fidler, Michael Huber, Michael Huber And Rachel Hamelers, Mike Mcclary, Peter C. Bjarkman, Rex Hamann, Rich Bogovich, Richard Cuicchi, Richard Moraski, Rory Costello And Lou Hernández, Seamus Kearney, Sidney Davis, Steve Smith, Thomas Ayers, Tom Hawthorn, Walter Leconte


Table of Contents:

Introduction MARC Z AARON

The Business of Baseball
During World War II JEFF OBERMEYER

“But Where is Pearl Harbor?” Baseball and the Day the World Changed, December 7, 1941 BOB LEMOINE

The Tri-Cornered War Bond Baseball Game MICHAEL HUBER AND RACHEL HAMELERS


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Boston Braves

How the Boston Braves Survived the War But Lost the Battle for Boston BOB BRADY

Ben Cardoni BY MARK S. STERNMAN

Buck Etchison BY ALAN COHEN

Butch Nieman BY SIDNEY DAVIS

Mystery Member of the ‘45 Braves BOB BRADY


Brooklyn Dodgers

The Brooklyn Dodgers in Wartime MICHAEL HUBER

John “Fats” D’Antonio RICHARD CUICCHI

Bill Hart BOB LEMOINE

Lee Pfund BOB WEBSTER


Chicago Cubs

The Cubs in Wartime THOMAS AYERS

Jorge Comellas RICH BOGOVICH

Billy Holm BILL NOWLIN

Walter Signer GREGORY H. WOLF


Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds During World War II JAY HURD

Tomás de la Cruz PETER C. BJARKMAN

Buck Fausett J. G. PRESTON

Dick Sipek CHARLES FABER 


New York Giants

The New York Giants in Wartime BOB MAYER 

Al Gardella CHARLIE WEATHERBY

Frank Seward JEFF MARLETT

Roy Zimmerman JOANNE HULBERT


Philadelphia Phillies

The Phillies in Wartime SEAMUS KEARNEY 

Chet Covington STEVE SMITH

Hilly Flitcraft JIM SWEETMAN 

Lee Riley MEL MARMER 


Pittsburgh Pirates

The Pirates in Wartime DAVID FINOLI 

Xavier Rescigno DAVID FINOLI

Len Gilmore DAVID FINOLI 

Frankie Zak DAVID FINOLI


St. Louis Cardinals

The Cardinals in Wartime GREGORY H. WOLF 

Jack Creel GREGORY H. WOLF

Gene Crumling GREGORY H. WOLF

Bob Keely GREGORY H. WOLF 


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston Red Sox

The Red Sox in Wartime BILL NOWLIN 

Otey Clark BILL NOWLIN

Ty LaForest BILL NOWLIN 

Stan Partenheimer JOHN SHANNAHAN 

The Frostbite League: Spring Training 1943 - 1945 BILL NOWLIN

The 1944 Red Sox: What Could Have Been DUKE GOLDMAN 


Chicago White Sox

The White Sox in Wartime DON ZMINDA 

Vince Castino DAVID RAGLIN AND BARB MANTEGANI 

Guy Curtright DON ZMINDA 

Floyd Speer REX HAMANN 


Cleveland Indians

World War II and the Cleveland Indians DAVID W. PUGH 

Otto Denning CHRIS RAINEY 

Jim McDonnell ASHLIE CHRISTIAN AND ARMAND PETERSON 

Mickey Rocco GREGG OMOTH


Detroit Tigers

The Tigers in Wartime MIKE MCCLARY 

Chuck Hostetler MARC LANCASTER 

Bobby Maier MARC LANCASTER 

Charlie Metro TOM HAWTHORN 


New York Yankees

The Yankees in Wartime MARC Z AARON

Joe Buzas MARC Z AARON 

Mike Garbark MARC Z AARON 

Bud Metheny MARC Z AARON 


Philadelphia Athletics

The Wartime Philadelphia Athletics DAVID M. JORDAN

Orie Arntzen GREGORY H. WOLF 

Jim Tyack ALAN COHEN

Woody Wheaton ALAN COHEN 


St. Louis Browns

The St. Louis Browns in World War II GREG ERION 

Milt Byrnes GREG ERION 

Charley Fuchs GREG ERION 

Pete Gray MEL MARMER 


Washington Senators

The Washington Senators in Wartime RICHARD MORASKI 

Ed Butka CORT VITTY

Jug Thesenga BOB LEMOINE 

Tony Zardón RORY COSTELLO AND LOU HERNÁNDEZ 

Senators Who Died in Combat RICHARD MORASKI 


OTHER ESSAYS

The All-Star Games in the War Years LYLE SPATZ 

Wartime Baseball: Minor Leagues, Major Changes (San Diego to Buffalo) JAMES D. SMITH, III 

Impact of WWII on the Negro Leagues LESLIE HEAPHY 

Baseball’s Women on the Field During WWII MERRIE A. FIDLER

In-season Exhibition Games During Wartime WALTER LECONTE 

The Double Victory Campaign and the Campaign to Integrate Baseball DUKE GOLDMAN 


 On June 28, 2002, over six hundred members of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) descended on Fenway Park for an interleague contest between the hometown Boston Red Sox and their National League rivals, the former Boston—-now Atlanta—-Braves. Sixty-four of these avid fans, historians, statisticians, and game enthusiasts recorded their experiences for this book. Some wrote from privileged views such as inside the Green Monster’s manual scoreboard, the Braves clubhouse, and the broad- cast booth, while others took in the essence of Fenway from the grandstand or bleachers. The result is a fascinating look at Major League Baseball, the Red Sox and their colorful history, the charms and challenges of Fenway Park, and the allure of being a baseball fan.


Including articles on Red Sox/Boston Braves history and the City Series, The Fenway Project combines historical background as only SABR can deliver it with this fascinating "one night at the ballpark" as recorded by 64 observers on the spot. From the man who sang the National Anthem (SABR member Joe Mancuso) to the woman who threw out the first pitch (SABR's president Claudia Perry), from a man in the bleachers to a woman in the press box, readers of The Fenway Project will see the game from all angles. 


Includes contributions by:

Jean Hastings ArdellPhil BergenSteve Bennett & The Bennett FamilyBob BradySteven Wolfgang BrooksBob BuegeAnne CampbellJeff CampbellJim CambpellJimmy CampbellGene CarneyKen CarpenterR. ChamberlainRandall ChandlerWill ChristensenRichard CohenDick DahlEric EndersJoe FavanoF.X. FlinnMichael FreimanRoy GedatRich GibsonIrv GoldfarbRich KleinFrancis KinlawR.J. LeschGlenn LeDouxDaniel LevineHoward LuloffJoseph MancusoPeter Mancuso Jr.Skip McAfeeLawr MichaelsWynn MontgomeryAndy MoyeBill NowlinPaul ParkerMark PattisonClaudia PerryFred PeltzR. PlapingerJim PrimeDenis ReppSusan RiggsJohn T. SaccomanRyan M. SaccomanAnthony SalazarJim SandovalLyle SpatzMichael SpatzSteve SteinbergCecilia TanStew ThornleyScott C. TurnerZack TriscuitLewis TrottJeff TwissJay WalkerAngela Jane WeislPeter WinskeSaul WisniaJohn ZajcAndrew Zinner


 The team now known as the Boston Red Sox played its first season in 1901. The city of Boston had a well-established National League team, known at the time as the Beaneaters, but the founders of the American League knew that Boston was a strong baseball market and when they launched the league as a new major league in 1901, they went head-to-head with the N.L. in Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boston. Chicago won the American League pennant and Boston finished second, just four games behind.

The Boston Americans played in a new ballpark — the Huntington Avenue Grounds — literally on the other side of the railroad tracks from the Beaneaters and they out-drew the Beaneaters by more than 2-1, in part because they had enticed some of the more popular players — player/ manager Jimmy Collins, pitcher Cy Young, and slugger Buck Freeman.

This volume represents the collective work of more than 25 members of SABR --the Society for American Baseball Research. It offers individual biographies of the players, team owner Charles Somers, league founder Ban Johnson, and two of the team's most noted fans: Hi Hi Dixwell and Nuf Ced McGreevy. There is also a "biography" of the Huntington Avenue Grounds ballpark and a study of media coverage of Boston baseball in 1901, and a timeline running from the first spring training through that year's postseason games.

Includes written contributions by the following SABR members: Bill Nowlin., Fred Schuld, Joe Santry and Cindy Thomson, Ron Selter, Donna L. Halper., Charlie Bevis, Steve Krah., Charles Faber, Dennis Auger, Jim Elfers, Eric Enders, Jack Morris, Paul Wendt, Frank Vaccaro, Rory Costello, Mike Lackey, Dan Desrochers, David Forrester, Tom Simon, David Southwick, Joanne Hulbert, Pete Nash, Dan Fields.

Full Table of Contents:
Introduction: Bill Nowlin
Franchise Firsts: Bill Nowlin
Team Owner: George Somers: Fred Schuld
American League President Ban Johnson: Joe Santry and Cindy Thomson
The Ballpark: Huntington Avenue Grounds: Ron Selter
A Fuller Portrait of the First Home Game of the Franchise
Baseball in the New Century: Following the Boston Americans in 1901: Donna L. Halper
The Players Ben Beville: Bill Nowlin
Jimmy Collins: Charlie Bevis
Lou Criger: Steve Krah
George “Nig” Cuppy: Charles Faber
Tommy Dowd: Bill Nowlin
Hobe Ferris: Dennis Auger
Frank Foreman: Jim Elfers
Buck Freeman: Eric Enders
Harry Gleason: Jack Morris
Charlie Hemphill: Paul Wendt
Charlie Jones: Frank Vaccaro
Win Kellum: Bill Nowlin
Ted Lewis: Rory Costello
Larry McLean: Mike Lackey
Fred Mitchell: Bill Nowlin
Frank Morrissey: Bill Nowlin
Freddy Parent: Dan Desrochers
George Prentiss: David Forrester
Osee Schrecongost: Bill Nowlin
Jack Slattery: Bill Nowlin
Chick Stahl: Dennis Auger
Jake Volz: Bill Nowlin
George Winter: Tom Simon
Cy Young: David Southwick
Personality: “Hi Hi” Dixwell:Joanne Hulbert
Personality: Mike “Nuf Ced” McGreevy: Pete Nash
1901 Boston Americans Season Timeline: Bill Nowlin
By the Numbers: Dan Fields
 Clem Labine was the "King of the Bullpen" so described by Robert Creamer of Sports Illustrated.  He was baseball's premier 'closer' two decades before the term 'closer' was ever used.  He led the League in 'saves' for years, a decade before 'saves' were even tallied.  He was twice an All Star and three times a World Series Champion.  As a Brooklyn Dodger, Clem ended with a Lifetime World Series ERA of a remarkable 1.65, and is a member of the Brooklyn Dodger Baseball Hall of Fame. As a rookie, he shut out the Giants in the second game of the iconic best-of-three 1951 playoffs. In the Dodgers' 1955 World Series Championship, he saved one game and won another.  The following year, he pitched the day after Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series and outdueled Yankee ace Bob Turley for a 10 inning 1-0 victory, going the distance.  And yet, though acknowledged by his peers as one of baseball's all-time greats, he is nearly forgotten by all except the most ardent of fans.  He played with Jackie Robinson and Carl Erskine and Pee Wee Reese and Campy and Hodges and the Duke. He was one of them and they knew it, and all of baseball knew it.  But the public recognition was never there.  One time in New York, Chicago Cubs manager Bob Scheffing was asked by a reporter "If you had your choice of any one pitcher in the entire league, who would you pick?'  'Labine' Scheffing said, without hesitation." (Robert Creamer, Sports Illustrated June 3, 1957)

     So why, we all ask.  Why history's failure to acknowledge Clem's talents and contributions?  I like Tommy Lasorda's explanation best of all;

"He played the game the way it was supposed to be played.  He gave it everything he had, he got along with everyone and everyone loved him.....He was one of the finest pitchers to ever play the game...... but he was surrounded by too many stars."

Therefore, maybe it is time to talk about my friend Clem Labine...to celebrate this Brooklyn Dodger Boy of Summer; this man of principle!  Not just the athlete, but the husband, father, friend, and proud citizen of his little home town of Woonsocket, R.I.  







"You talk about destiny, well, you
can't rule that out. We were hard-nosed and that showed up in 1957."
-- Braves catcher Del Crandall to editor Gregory H. Wolf





Few teams in baseball history have
captured the hearts of their fans like the Milwaukee Braves of the
19505. During the Braves' 13-year tenure in Milwaukee (1953-1965),
they had a winning record every season, won two consecutive NL
pennants (1957 and 1958), lost two more in the final week of the
season (1956 and 1959), and set big-league attendance records along
the way.





This book celebrates the Milwaukee
Braves' historic 1957 World Series championship season. Led by the
bats of National League Most Valuable Player Henry Aaron and slugging
third baseman Eddie Mathews and the "Big Three" pitching
trio (Cy Young Award winner Warren Spahn, Lew Burdette, and Bob Buhl)
the Braves won 95 games. The team enjoyed standout seasons by
shortstop Johnny Logan, outfielder Wes Covington, and catcher Del
Crandall And GM John Quinn pulled off the biggest trade of the
summer, acquiring All-Star second baseman Red Schoendienst from the
New York Giants. The Braves cemented their place in history by
defeating the New York Yankees in the World Series. In one of the
greatest performances in the history of the fall classic, crafty Lew
Burdette tossed his second consecutive shutout (and third complete
game) to defeat the Bronx Bombers in Game Seven, in Yankee Stadium.





A collaborative effort of 32 members of
the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), Thar's Joy in
Braveland! The 1957 Milwaukee Braves portrays that memorable team
with life stories of all of the roster players, the manager and
coaching staff, the owner, the general manager, and sportswriters and
radio announcers. Summaries of the regular season and World Series
re-create the magic of that unforgettable season.





Table of Contents:


Introduction:The
Milwaukee Braves Make History by Gregory H Wolf


From
Yawkey to Milwaukee: Lou Perini Makes his Move by Saul Wisnia






THE
BRAVES


Henry
“Hank” Aaron by William Johnson


Joe Adcock by
Gregory H Wolf


Bill Bruton by
John Harry Stahl


Bob Buhl by
Gregory H Wolf


Lew
Burdette by Alex Kupfer


Dick
Cole by Doug Engleman


Gene
Conley by John R Husman


Wes
Covington by Andy Sturgill


Del
Crandall by Gregory H Wolf


Ray
Crone by Gregory H Wolf


John
DeMerit by Steven Schmitt


Harry
Hanebrink by Andy Sturgill


Bob
Hazle by Nancy Snell Griffith


Joey
Jay by Joe Wancho


Ernie
Johnson by Dana Sprague


Dave
Jolly by Chip Greene


Nippy
Jones by Dan Fields


Johnny
Logan by Bob Buege


Bobby
Malkmus by Gregory H Wolf


Felix
Mantilla by Rick Schabowski


Eddie
Mathews by David Fleitz


Don
McMahon by John Vorperian


Red
Murff by Michael J Bielawa


Danny
O’Connell by Mel Marmer


Andy
Pafko by Dale Voiss


Phil
Paine by Chip Greene


Taylor
Phillips by Rick Schabowski


Juan
Pizarro by Rory Costello


Del
Rice by Norm King


Mel
Roach by David Fleitz


Carl
Sawatski by Gregory H Wolf


Red
Schoendienst by Kristen Lokemoen


Ray
Shearer by William Johnson


Warren
Spahn by Jim Kaplan


Chuck
Tanner by Dan Fields


Hawk
Taylor by Steven Schmitt


Bobby
Thomson by Jeff Findley


Frank
Torre by Norm King


Bob
Trowbridge by Nancy Snell Griffith






THE
MANAGER


Fred
Haney by Jim Gordon






THE
COACHES


Bob
Keely by Gregory H Wolf


Johnny
Riddle by Nancy Snell Griffith


Charlie
Root by Gregory H Wolf


Connie
Ryan by John McMurray






GENERAL
MANAGER


John
Quinn by Rory Costello






County
Stadium by Gregg Hoffmann


Jane
Jarvis by Rory Costello






THE
SPORTSWRITERS


Headlines
and Deadlines: Wordsmiths of the Braves by Bob Buege


Lou
Chapman by Bob Buege


Red
Thisted by Bob Buege


Bob
Wolf by Bob Buege






RADIO
ANNOUNCERS


Voices
of the Braves: Blaine Walsh and Earl Gillespie by Bob Buege






REGULAR
SEASON SUMMARY


The
Milwaukee Braves Season Timeline and Summary by Gregory H Wolf






WORLD
SERIES SUMMARY


World
Series Summary by Norm King






By
the Numbers: Milwaukee Braves in 1957 by Dan Fields


Thirteen
Years of Magic by Bob Buege

 

Every spring, Little Leaguers across the country mimic his stance and squabble over the right to wear his number, 2, the next number to be retired by the world’s most famous ball team. Derek Jeter is their hero. He walks in the footsteps of Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, and Mantle, and someday his shadow will loom just as large. Yet he has never been the best player in baseball. In fact, he hasn’t always been the best player on his team. But his intangible grace and Jordanesque ability to play big in the biggest of postseason moments make him the face of the modern Yankee dynasty, and of America’s game.

In The Captain, best-selling author Ian O’Connor draws on extensive reporting and unique access to Jeter that has spanned some fifteen years to reveal how a biracial kid from Michigan became New York’s most beloved sports figure and the enduring symbol of the steroid-free athlete. O’Connor takes us behind the scenes of a legendary baseball life and career, from Jeter’s early struggles in the minor leagues, when homesickness and errors in the field threatened a stillborn career, to his heady days as a Yankee superstar and prince of the city who squired some of the world’s most beautiful women, to his tense battles with former best friend A-Rod. We also witness Jeter struggling to come to terms with his declining skills and the declining favor of the only organization he ever wanted to play for, leading to a contentious contract negotiation with the Yankees that left people wondering if Jeter might end his career in a uniform without pinstripes.

Derek Jeter’s march toward the Hall of Fame has been dignified and certain, but behind that leadership and hero’s grace there are hidden struggles and complexities that have never been explored, until now. As Jeter closes in on 3,000 hits, a number no Yankee has ever touched, The Captain offers an incisive, exhilarating, and revealing new look at one of the game’s greatest players in the gloaming of his career.

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