The Ghosts of Medak Pocket: The Story of Canada's Secret War

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In 1993, Canadian peacekeepers in Croatia were plunged into the most significant fighting Canada had seen since the Korean War. Their extraordinary heroism was covered up and forgotten. The ghosts of that battlefield have haunted them ever since.

Canadian peacekeepers in Medak Pocket, Croatia, found no peace to keep in September 1993. They engaged the forces of ethnic cleansing in a deadly firefight and drove them from the area under United Nations protection. The soldiers should have returned home as heroes. Instead, they arrived under a cloud of suspicion and silence.

In Medak Pocket, members of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry did exactly the job they were trained — and ordered — to do. When attacked by the Croat army they returned fire and fought back valiantly to protect Serbian civilians and to save the UN mandate in Croatia. Then they confronted the horrors of the offensive’s aftermath — the annihilation by the Croat army of Serbian villages. The Canadians searched for survivors. There were none.

The soldiers came home haunted by these atrocities, but in the wake of the Somalia affair, Canada had no time for soldiers’ stories of the horrific compromises of battle — the peacekeepers were silenced. In time, the dark secrets of Medak’s horrors drove many of these soldiers to despair, to homelessness and even suicide.

Award-winning journalist Carol Off brings to life this decisive battle of the Canadian Forces. The Ghosts of Medak Pocket is the complete and untold story.
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About the author

Carol Off has witnessed and reported on many of the world’s conflicts, from the fall of Yugoslavia to the US-led war on terror. She has won numerous awards for her television and radio work, including coverage of the ethnic cleansing of Bosnia. She lives and works in Toronto.
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Additional information

Publisher
Vintage Canada
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Published on
Jul 30, 2010
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780307370785
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
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