Joy Nwosu Lo-Bamijoko: The Saga of a Nigerian Female Ethnomusicologist

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Joy Nwosu Lo-Bamijoko is a professionally trained operatic soprano, music educator, music critic, African ethnomusicologist, broadcaster, skits writer, choral conductor, and songwriter. Joy Nwosu was trained in operatic soprano in Italy and received her Ph.D. in music from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; making her the second Nigerian female to earn a doctorate in music. This book addresses thought provoking issues such as feminist gender, it’s a man’s world, and the Nigerian factor. Other pertinent issues narrated in the book include the efficacy of prayer and spectacular triumphs by the power of God. The saga of Joy Nwosu encapsulates the ordeal women are constantly subjected to in a male chauvinistic society. This book is also laced with numerous fascinating photos of Joy Nwosu from 1960 to 2005. Nigerian journalists wrote rave reviews of Joy Nwosu’s stunning performances and crowned her, “first lady of sound,” “diva,” “maestro,” and “high priestess of Nigerian music;” titles that she rightfully earned and deserved for three veritable reasons: (1) Joy Nwosu was the first professionally trained female musician in Nigeria to combine operatic singing with popular dance music; (2) she was the first trained female musician to set up a dance band in Nigeria; and (3) Joy Nwosu was the first trained female musician to release a Long Playing record in Nigeria.
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Additional Information

Publisher
iUniverse
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Published on
Mar 6, 2012
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Pages
172
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ISBN
9781469785875
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Entertainment & Performing Arts
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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—Jacques Barzun

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Rock stars and rap gods. Comedy legends and A-list actors. Supermodels and centerfolds. Moguls and mobsters. A president.

Over his unrivaled four-decade career in radio, Howard Stern has interviewed thousands of personalities—discussing sex, relationships, money, fame, spirituality, and success with the boldest of bold-faced names. But which interviews are his favorites? It’s one of the questions he gets asked most frequently. Howard Stern Comes Again delivers his answer.

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