Social Control and Multiple Discovery in Science: The Opiate Receptor Case

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Recognition for accomplishment is a major institutional reward in the scientific community, thus regulating disputes over credit for discovery, can be viewed as an important problem in social control. Cozzens examines a well-known dispute — one that took place with the discovery of the opiate receptor in neuropharmacological research.

The issues Cozzens discusses — priority disputes, social control, and norms and morals — are important throughout the sciences; they are crucial factors in the lives of scientists, the functioning of scientific communities, and the day-to-day operations of scientific organizations.
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About the author

Susan E. Cozzens is Assistant Professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
236
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ISBN
9781438400013
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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