Marginalization Processes across Different Settings: Going beyond the Mainstream

Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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While issues of marginalization and participation have engaged scholars across various disciplines and domains, and a range of theoretical perspectives and methodological framings have been deployed in this enterprise, the research presented in this volume aligns itself to alternative traditions by focusing on people’s membership and participation across settings and institutional contexts. The work here, thus, focuses on the constitution of marginalization inside, outside and across a range of settings. It centre-stages marginalization and participation as action in the human world. Going beyond a focus on the marginalized or explanations of marginalization or comparing groups of the marginalized with the non-marginalized, a number of contributions focus on mundane processes inside, outside and across institutional settings in different geopolitical spaces. Other chapters in the book demonstrate the marginalization of specific analytical foci in the research process or hegemonies of national high-stake testing protocols and specific dialects in different geopolitical regions or in domains such as the sporting arena.

In contrast to other studies on marginalization and participation, this book takes its point of departure in the complexities that characterize and shape both individuals and societies, past and present. Its chapters challenge demarcated fields of study and conceptions of identity framed marginalization and participation. Drawing attention to the fact that the centre (continues to) define the margins, the work presented here joins research efforts that highlight the need to focus on the constitution of marginalization and participation in a wide range of settings with the explicit aim of going beyond static boundaries that define the human state at different scales of becoming and beyond an understanding of development and progress in terms of a linear trajectory.

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About the author

Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta is Full Professor of Education at Jönköping University, Sweden. Her ethnographically framed multidisciplinary research focuses on issues of communication, learning and identity from sociocultural and decolonial framings. She publishes on a wide range of issues and currently leads the Swedish Research Council project “Participation for all?” (PAL). She is the scientific leader of the research group “Communication, Culture and Diversity” (CCD) and “Learning Practices inside and outside Schools” (LPS).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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Published on
Jun 11, 2018
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Pages
460
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ISBN
9781527511927
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Sociolinguistics
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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In bidialectal speech communities it is common practice that standard dialects are strongly favoured in education whereas the role of nonstandard dialects is highly disputed. Several countries in Europe have successfully dealt with the use of dialects in education while in other countries such matters have yet to be adequately addressed and successfully resolved. Some educators are still debating as to whether dialects and nonstandard languages should be used in education because, among other concerns, they erroneously question the adequacy of dialects in meeting speakers’ communicative needs. In the same vein, others do not seem to be convinced that conducting education in a dialect is beneficial for all members of a community.

Sociolinguistic and Pedagogical Dimensions of Dialects in Education brings together various theoretical, descriptive and empirical findings on the status of non-standard dialects, their relation and coexistence with standard or official languages and their potential use in education. Gaining insights in such issues is of immense importance to researchers, policy makers, educators, parents and children since it can help in creating an educational environment that would respect the linguistic rights of bidialectal speakers and be a source for their empowerment.

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Popular assumptions about gender and communication - famously summed up in the title of the massively influential 1992 bestseller Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus - can have unforeseen but far-reaching consequences in many spheres of life, from attitudes to the phenomenon of 'date-rape' to expectations of achievement at school, and potential discrimination in the work-place. In this wide-ranging and thoroughly readable book, Deborah Cameron, Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication at Oxford University and author of a number of leading texts in the field of language and gender studies, draws on over 30 years of scientific research to explain what we really know and to demonstrate how this is often very different from the accounts we are familiar with from recent popular writing. Ambitious in scope and exceptionally accessible, The Myth of Mars and Venus tells it like it is: widely accepted attitudes from the past and from other cultures are at heart related to assumptions about language and the place of men and women in society; and there is as much similarity and variation within each gender as between men and women, often associated with social roles and relationships. The author goes on to consider the influence of Darwinian theories of natural selection and the notion that girls and boys are socialized during childhood into different ways of using language, before addressing problems of 'miscommunication' surrounding, for example, sex and consent to sex, and women's relative lack of success in work and politics. Arguing that what linguistic differences there are between men and women are driven by the need to construct and project personal meaning and identity, Cameron concludes that we have an urgent need to think about gender in more complex ways than the prevailing myths and stereotypes allow. A compelling and insightful read for anyone with an interest in communication, language, and the sexes.
More than a quarter of a century ago, Leo Rosten published the first comprehensive and hilariously entertaining lexicon of the colorful and deeply expressive language of Yiddish. Said “to give body and soul to the Yiddish language,” The Joys of Yiddish went on to become an indispensable tool for writers, journalists, politicians, and students, as well as a perennial bestseller for three decades.

Rosten described his book as “a relaxed lexicon of Yiddish, Hebrew, and Yinglish words often encountered in English, plus dozens that ought to be, with serendipitous excursions into Jewish humor, habits, holidays, history, religion, ceremonies, folklore, and cuisine–the whole generously garnished with stories, anecdotes, epigrams, Talmudic quotations, folk sayings, and jokes.” To this day, it is considered the seminal work on Yiddish in America–a true classic and a staple in the libraries of Jews and non-Jews alike.

With the recent renaissance of interest in Yiddish, and in keeping with a language that embodies the variety and vibrancy of life itself, The New Joys of Yiddish brings Leo Rosten’s masterful work up to date. Revised for the first time by Lawrence Bush in close consultation with Rosten’s daughters, it retains the spirit of the original–with its wonderful jokes, tidbits of cultural history, Talmudic and Biblical references, and tips on pronunciation–and enhances it with hundreds of new entries, thoughtful commentary on how Yiddish has evolved over the years, and an invaluable new English-to-Yiddish index. In addition, The New Joys of Yiddish includes wondrous and amusing illustrations by renowned artist R.O. Blechman.
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