The Archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of an Ancient Iranian State, Edition 2

Cambridge University Press
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Elam was an important state in southwestern Iran from the third millennium BC to the appearance of the Persian Empire and beyond. Less well-known than its neighbors in Mesopotamia, Anatolia, the Levant or Egypt, it was nonetheless a region of extraordinary cultural vitality. This book examines the formation and transformation of Elam's many identities through both archaeological and written evidence, and brings to life one of the most important regions of Western Asia, re-evaluates its significance, and places it in the context of the most recent archaeological and historical scholarship. The new edition includes material from over 800 additional sources, reflecting the enormous amount of fieldwork and scholarship on Iran since 1999. Every chapter contains new insights and material that have been seamlessly integrated into the text in order to give the reader an up-to-date understanding of ancient Elam.
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About the author

D. T. Potts is Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology and History at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University. He is the editor of The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Iran (2013) and the author of Nomadism in Iran: From Antiquity to the Modern Era (2014), as well as numerous other books and articles in scholarly journals.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Nov 12, 2015
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Pages
954
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ISBN
9781316586310
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / General
History / Middle East / General
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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