Recovered Not Cured: A journey through schizophrenia

Allen & Unwin
7
Free sample

Edinburgh, 1994 I am crouching in an alleyway. They can t see me here, so for the moment I am safe. There must be hundreds of loudspeakers projecting secret messages at me, and umpteen video cameras tracking every move I make...They will tie me up, soak my feet in water and have goats lick my feet down to the bone...

Melbourne, 2003 'Nowadays I say that I am recovered, not cured. I have a job, I have my band, I have my friends and my family. I pay my taxes and do the dishes; I'm independent. A couple of pills a day keep me slightly lethargic yet sane . I can live with that.'

Mental illness is common, and often devastating. In this day and age it is a treatable condition, yet many are left untreated, misunderstood. Richard McLean is one of the lucky ones. His words and pictures give us a unique and poignant insight into a hidden, internal world.

This is a powerful, quirky and important book. Powerful because it goes straight to the heart of battling a psychotic illness. Quirky because of the author s abundant creativity and the delight of his illustrations. Important because it outstrips anything else I have read about schizophrenia for its insight into the nature of psychotic thinking and behaviour. McLean writes with a bold simplicity and deftly avoids melodrama and bathos. Anne Deveson
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About the author

Richard McLean is a graphic artist/illustrator currently working for the Age newspaper in Melbourne. This is his first book.
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4.7
7 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Allen & Unwin
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Published on
May 1, 2003
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781741151343
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Nonfiction / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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