A Modest Proposal for the Replacement of Our Outdated Gender Binary Classification System with One More Suited for Our Progressive Age

Silver Layer Publications
1

Our reality-based gender classification system has proven too old-fashioned for the demands of 21st-century taste. It's time to replace it with something more inclusive and flexible. After all, the sky is whatever color we want it to be, isn't it?
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About the author

www.stephenmeasure.com

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5.0
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Additional Information

Publisher
Silver Layer Publications
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Published on
Apr 14, 2016
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Pages
12
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ISBN
9781940778341
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Language
English
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Genres
Humor / Form / Essays
Humor / Topic / Political
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Content protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Meet Ralph Plotkin—a Los Angeles lawyer whose career has gone into the tank. A recovering compulsive gambler who has stolen from his client's trust fund, Ralph is under investigation by the State Bar, and owes money to a Korean Mafia loan-shark. Reduced to crashing posh Hollywood parties to forage for food, Ralph is about to skip out to Mexico, when he encounters Iris Labelle, a wannabe actress and resigned anorexic and bulimic, who suggests that maybe her eating disorder stems from her childhood doll. The Bobbie Doll.  Not to be confused with Barbie, this child-like androgynous doll (who sometimes wears a nose-ring and tattoo) is flat-chested and Twiggy-thin—just like Iris.

Enter Charlie Kim—a Swarthmore grad posing as the head of the Korean Mafia who wants to be the next Steven Spielberg—and his cleaver wielding cousin, Genghis. When they threaten to make kimchi out of Ralph's index fingers, Ralph promises payment from the proceeds of a lawsuit against the manufacturer of the Bobbie Doll.  It seems the doll suffered from a design defect—it was unnaturally thin—which caused young women to suffer from anorexia and bulimia. "A sure winner.  We're suing for millions," says Ralph.

Readers who join Ralph in his efforts to promote a nuisance suit into a nationwide class action, will encounter intrigue, conspiracy, agents and double-agents, and a bizarre cast of malady-ridden characters that include a militant woman's movement, a  knuckle-cracking, megalomaniac defense attorney, the octogenarian, hypochondriac Chairman of a Korean conglomerate and his shaman priestess, a forensic psychiatrist suffering from agoraphobia, and thousands of emaciated young women who started out life with the Bobbie Doll—the doll of the Eighties and Nineties.

Slender Fantasies is a fast paced satire of the legal profession, that will keep you turning pages until the final plot-twisting denouement, when Ralph, facing insurmountable odds, stands alone in a David and Goliath courtroom confrontation to prove that playing with dolls—at least the Bobbie Doll—-really can be dangerous to a young girl's health.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed

NAMED ONE OF PASTE’S BEST MEMOIRS OF THE DECADE • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Michiko Kakutani, New York Times • USA Today • San Francisco Chronicle • NPR • Esquire • Newsday • Booklist

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life.

The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love.

Praise for Born a Crime

“Compelling . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah’s] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah’s family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author’s remarkable mother.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
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