Think Tanks in America

University of Chicago Press
6
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Over the past half-century, think tanks have become fixtures of American politics, supplying advice to presidents and policy makers, expert testimony on Capitol Hill, and convenient facts and figures to journalists and media specialists. But what are think tanks? Who funds them? What kind of “research” do they produce? Where does their authority come from? And how influential have they become? In Think Tanks in America, Thomas Medvetz argues that the unsettling ambiguity of the think tank is less an accidental feature of its existence than the very key to its impact. By combining elements of more established sources of public knowledge—universities, government agencies, businesses, and the media—think tanks exert a tremendous amount of influence on the way citizens and lawmakers perceive the world, unbound by the more clearly defined roles of those other institutions. In the process, they transform the government of this country, the press, and the political role of intellectuals. Timely, succinct, and instructive, this provocative book will force us to rethink our understanding of the drivers of political debate in the United States.
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About the author

Thomas Medvetz is assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, San Diego.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Aug 9, 2012
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Pages
344
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ISBN
9780226517308
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 20th Century
Political Science / American Government / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / Political Process / General
Political Science / Public Policy / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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