Zookeeping: An Introduction to the Science and Technology

University of Chicago Press
2
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As species extinction, environmental protection, animal rights, and workplace safety issues come to the fore, zoos and aquariums need keepers who have the technical expertise and scientific knowledge to keep animals healthy, educate the public, and create regional, national, and global conservation and management communities. This textbook offers a comprehensive and practical overview of the profession geared toward new animal keepers and anyone who needs a foundational account of the topics most important to the day-to-day care of zoo and aquarium animals. The three editors, all experienced in zoo animal care and management, have put together a cohesive and broad-ranging book that tackles each of its subjects carefully and thoroughly. The contributions cover professional zookeeping, evolution of zoos, workplace safety, animal management, taxon-specific animal husbandry, animal behavior, veterinary care, public education and outreach, and conservation science. Using the newest techniques and research gathered from around the world, Zookeeping is a progressive textbook that seeks to promote consistency and the highest standards within global zoo and aquarium operations.
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About the author

Mark D. Irwin has worked in zoos as a keeper, curator, and veterinarian, and is now director of the zoo technology program at State University of New York–Jefferson Community College in Watertown, where he trains future zookeepers. John B. Stoner has decades of experience in zoo animal care as a keeper and animal care manager at Toronto Zoo and has been an adjunct faculty member of Sheridan College in Brampton, Ontario, where he taught exotic animal science. Aaron M. Cobaugh is an associate professor and coordinator of the animal management program at State University of New York–Niagara County Community College in Sanborn, where he teaches zoo-related courses that train future zookeepers, and is a former keeper himself.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Dec 9, 2013
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Pages
816
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ISBN
9780226925325
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / General
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / General
Science / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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