Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone?

Princeton University Press
Free sample

A candid assessment of why the job market is not as healthy as we think

Don't trust low unemployment numbers as proof that the labor market is doing fine—it isn't. Not Working is about those who can’t find full-time work at a decent wage—the underemployed—and how their plight is contributing to widespread despair, a worsening drug epidemic, and the unchecked rise of right-wing populism.

In this revelatory and outspoken book, David Blanchflower draws on his acclaimed work in the economics of labor and well-being to explain why today's postrecession economy is vastly different from what came before. He calls out our leaders and policymakers for failing to see the Great Recession coming, and for their continued failure to address one of the most unacknowledged social catastrophes of our time. Blanchflower shows how many workers are underemployed or have simply given up trying to find a well-paying job, how wage growth has not returned to prerecession levels despite rosy employment indicators, and how general prosperity has not returned since the crash of 2008.

Standard economic measures are often blind to these forgotten workers, which is why Blanchflower practices the "economics of walking about"—seeing for himself how ordinary people are faring under the recovery, and taking seriously what they say and do. Not Working is his candid report on how the young and the less skilled are among the worst casualties of underemployment, how immigrants are taking the blame, and how the epidemic of unhappiness and self-destruction will continue to spread unless we deal with it.

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About the author

David G. Blanchflower is the Bruce V. Rauner Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College, professor of economics at the University of Stirling, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is the coauthor of The Wage Curve. He lives in Canaan, New Hampshire. Twitter @D_Blanchflower
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Jun 18, 2019
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Pages
456
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ISBN
9780691186009
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic Conditions
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / Labor
Political Science / American Government / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
Political Science / Public Policy / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Services & Welfare
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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