Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet

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Twenty five years ago, it didn't exist. Today, twenty million people worldwide are surfing the Net. Where Wizards Stay Up Late is the exciting story of the pioneers responsible for creating the most talked about, most influential, and most far-reaching communications breakthrough since the invention of the telephone.
In the 1960's, when computers where regarded as mere giant calculators, J.C.R. Licklider at MIT saw them as the ultimate communications devices. With Defense Department funds, he and a band of visionary computer whizzes began work on a nationwide, interlocking network of computers. Taking readers behind the scenes, Where Wizards Stay Up Late captures the hard work, genius, and happy accidents of their daring, stunningly successful venture.
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About the author

Katie Hafner is a technology correspondent at Newsweek and coauthor of Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hackers on the Computer Frontier. Matthew Lyon and Katie Hafner are married and live in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Aug 19, 1999
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780684872162
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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`Internet Communication and Qualitative Research is a trailblazing introduction to data sources that will come to the fore in the new millennium. Its cogent discussion of the techniques, ethics and methods of analysis of Internet data should be read by every qualitative researcher' - David Silverman, Goldsmiths College

`The internet is exploding with possibilities for conducting social research. Mann and Stewart offer the first in-depth consideration of the prospects and potentials for doing qualitative research on-line. This wide ranging, clearly-written book is essential reading for researchers working at the cutting edge of qualitative methodology' - James A. Holstein, Marquette University

`This is e-scholarship. The book is a transformative project which brings the best skills of the old print scholarship to the cyberworld. The authors are no mere theoreticians - but hands-on net-users, who have made the imaginative leap to the dot.com world, and who have mapped the way for net research and researchers.

The authors are pioneers in the realm of digit-crit - opening the way with their critical evaluation of the digital media and net research. They profile the skills required by the online researcher and evaluate the context in which they are used - in relation to privacy, security, ethics and legal considerations. They also take up issues of power; they explore the social and political implications of the digital media, (with specific reference to gender) and the role of the online researcher.

An absolute must for cybercitizens and an indispensable guide for students, researchers, and knowledge workers in the dot.com world' - Dale Spender

`Mann and Stewart have prized open the mysteries of on-line qualitative research. For those new to this methodology the technology review demystifies; the social science research ethics issues are re-addressed with reference to the on-line situation; methods of conducting online focus groups and interviews, in particular, are detailed. The tone is both analytical and practical with a host of techniques suggested. I recommend this accessible text for all qualitative researchers, both academic and practitioner' - Rehan Ul-Haq, University of Birmingham Business School

`Here is the clear, useful guide to the Internet research needed by all of us interested in on-line relationships and research. The authors address such issues as ethics, confidentiality, the theory and practice of on-line research, and on-line power relationships (which will be of concern in distance learning plans and programs). A very valuable book.' - Cheris Kramarae, Center for the Study of Women in Society, University of Oregon

`Wonderful - "beyond the software" and into on-line interaction to aid and abet our qualitative research. This book shines the light. Mann and Stewart are to be congratulated in offering qualitative researchers effective and authentic ways forward through electronic communication. I'll use and recommend it!' - Gilly Salmon, Centre for Information and Innovation, Open University Business School

`Opens to view a whole new avenue for social research. Internet communication is the wave of the future. Mann and Stewart capture its potential with insight, caution, and consummate procedural skill. Pathbreaking in its area of research methodology! Students and researchers will be very pleased with its clarity and usefulness' - Jaber F Gubrium, Department of Sociology, University of Florida

`The authors have produced a timely and stimulating publication with handy explanations of Internet terms and qualitative research applications. This work should be made readily available not only for reference to academics and practitioners of marketing, but also to those with a lay interest in it' - Professor Len Tiu Wright, De Montfort University

Internet Communication and Qualitative Research is the first textbook to examine the impact of Internet technology on qualitative research methods.

Drawing on many pioneering studies using computer-mediated communication (CMC), the authors show how online researchers can employ Internet-based qualitative methods to collect rich, descriptive, contextually-situated data. They discuss the methodological, practical and theoretical considerations associated with such methods as: in-depth online interviewing, virtual focus groups, participant observation in virtual communities.

This is a comprehensive and practical guide that:

- reviews online research practice and basic Internet technology

- looks in detail at the skills required by the online researcher

- examines the ethical, confidentiality, security and legal issues involved in online research

- considers the theoretical challenges surrounding data collected in a 'virtual venue'

- addresses the social and cultural impact of researching online through a discussion of power, gender and identity issues in the virtual world.

Internet Communication and Qualitative Research will be an indispensable guide for all students and researchers working in the digital age.

The complex, deeply binding relationship between mothers and daughters is brought vividly to life in Katie Hafner’s remarkable memoir, an exploration of the year she and her mother, Helen, spent working through, and triumphing over, a lifetime of unresolved emotions.
 
Dreaming of a “year in Provence” with her mother, Katie urges Helen to move to San Francisco to live with her and Zoë, Katie’s teenage daughter. Katie and Zoë had become a mother-daughter team, strong enough, Katie thought, to absorb the arrival of a seventy-seven-year-old woman set in her ways.
 
Filled with fairy-tale hope that she and her mother would become friends, and that Helen would grow close to her exceptional granddaughter, Katie embarked on an experiment in intergenerational living that she would soon discover was filled with land mines: memories of her parents’ painful divorce, of her mother’s drinking, of dislocating moves back and forth across the country,  and of Katie’s own widowhood and bumpy recovery. Helen, for her part, was also holding difficult issues at bay.
 
How these three women from such different generations learn to navigate their challenging, turbulent, and ultimately healing journey together makes for riveting reading. By turns heartbreaking and funny—and always insightful—Katie Hafner’s brave and loving book answers questions about the universal truths of family that are central to the lives of so many.

Praise for Mother Daughter Me
 
“The most raw, honest and engaging memoir I’ve read in a long time.”—KJ Dell’Antonia, The New York Times
 
“A brilliant, funny, poignant, and wrenching story of three generations under one roof, unlike anything I have ever read.”—Abraham Verghese, author of Cutting for Stone
 
“Weaving past with present, anecdote with analysis, [Katie] Hafner’s riveting account of multigenerational living and mother-daughter frictions, of love and forgiveness, is devoid of self-pity and unafraid of self-blame. . . . [Hafner is] a bright—and appealing—heroine.”—Cathi Hanauer, Elle
 
“[A] frank and searching account . . . Currents of grief, guilt, longing and forgiveness flow through the compelling narrative.”—Steven Winn, San Francisco Chronicle
 
“A touching saga that shines . . . We see how years-old unresolved emotions manifest.”—Lindsay Deutsch, USA Today
 
“[Hafner’s] memoir shines a light on nurturing deficits repeated through generations and will lead many readers to relive their own struggles with forgiveness.”—Erica Jong, People

“An unusually graceful story, one that balances honesty and tact . . . Hafner narrates the events so adeptly that they feel enlightening.”—Harper’s
 
“Heartbreakingly honest, yet not without hope and flashes of wry humor.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“[An] emotionally raw memoir examining the delicate, inevitable shift from dependence to independence and back again.”—O: The Oprah Magazine (Ten Titles to Pick Up Now)
 
“Scrap any romantic ideas about what goes on when a 40-something woman invites her mother to live with her and her teenage daughter for a year. As Hafner hilariously and touchingly tells it, being the center of a family sandwich is, well, complicated.”—Parade
In the early 1960s, computers haunted the American popular imagination. Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military-industrial complex possible. But by the 1990s—and the dawn of the Internet—computers started to represent a very different kind of world: a collaborative and digital utopia modeled on the communal ideals of the hippies who so vehemently rebelled against the cold war establishment in the first place.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture is the first book to explore this extraordinary and ironic transformation. Fred Turner here traces the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay–area entrepreneurs: Stewart Brand and the Whole Earth network. Between 1968 and 1998, via such familiar venues as the National Book Award–winning Whole Earth Catalog, the computer conferencing system known as WELL, and, ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running collaboration between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley. Thanks to their vision, counterculturalists and technologists alike joined together to reimagine computers as tools for personal liberation, the building of virtual and decidedly alternative communities, and the exploration of bold new social frontiers.

Shedding new light on how our networked culture came to be, this fascinating book reminds us that the distance between the Grateful Dead and Google, between Ken Kesey and the computer itself, is not as great as we might think.

The magnificent, unrivaled history of codes and ciphers -- how they're made, how they're broken, and the many and fascinating roles they've played since the dawn of civilization in war, business, diplomacy, and espionage -- updated with a new chapter on computer cryptography and the Ultra secret.

Man has created codes to keep secrets and has broken codes to learn those secrets since the time of the Pharaohs. For 4,000 years, fierce battles have been waged between codemakers and codebreakers, and the story of these battles is civilization's secret history, the hidden account of how wars were won and lost, diplomatic intrigues foiled, business secrets stolen, governments ruined, computers hacked. From the XYZ Affair to the Dreyfus Affair, from the Gallic War to the Persian Gulf, from Druidic runes and the kaballah to outer space, from the Zimmermann telegram to Enigma to the Manhattan Project, codebreaking has shaped the course of human events to an extent beyond any easy reckoning. Once a government monopoly, cryptology today touches everybody. It secures the Internet, keeps e-mail private, maintains the integrity of cash machine transactions, and scrambles TV signals on unpaid-for channels. David Kahn's The Codebreakers takes the measure of what codes and codebreaking have meant in human history in a single comprehensive account, astonishing in its scope and enthralling in its execution. Hailed upon first publication as a book likely to become the definitive work of its kind, The Codebreakers has more than lived up to that prediction: it remains unsurpassed. With a brilliant new chapter that makes use of previously classified documents to bring the book thoroughly up to date, and to explore the myriad ways computer codes and their hackers are changing all of our lives, The Codebreakers is the skeleton key to a thousand thrilling true stories of intrigue, mystery, and adventure. It is a masterpiece of the historian's art.
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