Infrared Characterization For Microelectronics

World Scientific
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Most of the books on infrared characterization are for applications in chemistry and no book has been dedicated to infrared characterization for microelectronics. The focus of the book will be on practical applications useful to the production line and to the research and development of microelectronics. The background knowledge and significance of doing a particular type of infrared measurement will be discussed in detail. The principal purpose of the book is to serve as a useful handbook for practising engineers and scientists in the field of microelectronics.
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Additional Information

Publisher
World Scientific
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Published on
Oct 1, 1999
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Pages
172
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ISBN
9789814500074
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Materials Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Because of the rapid increase in commercially available Fourier transform infrared spectrometers and computers over the past ten years, it has now become feasible to use IR spectrometry to characterize very thin films at extended interfaces. At the same time, interest in thin films has grown tremendously because of applications in microelectronics, sensors, catalysis, and nanotechnology. The Handbook of Infrared Spectroscopy of Ultrathin Films provides a practical guide to experimental methods, up-to-date theory, and considerable reference data, critical for scientists who want to measure and interpret IR spectra of ultrathin films. This authoritative volume also: Offers information needed to effectively apply IR spectroscopy to the analysis and evaluation of thin and ultrathin films on flat and rough surfaces and on powders at solid-gaseous, solid-liquid, liquid-gaseous, liquid-liquid, and solid-solid interfaces.
* Provides full discussion of theory underlying techniques
* Describes experimental methods in detail, including optimum conditions for recording spectra and the interpretation of spectra
* Gives detailed information on equipment, accessories, and techniques
* Provides IR spectroscopic data tables as appendixes, including the first compilation of published data on longitudinal frequencies of different substances
* Covers new approaches, such as Surface Enhanced IR spectroscopy (SEIR), time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy, high-resolution microspectroscopy and using synchotron radiation
The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been the focus of intense study since the late 1980s. Since that time, research has continued to demonstrate the potential of OLEDs as viable systems for displays and eco-friendly lighting applications. Thejokalyani and Sanjay Dhoble have given historical introduction to OLEDs in the first chapter under the title “Importance of Eco-friendly OLED Lighting”. They describe core fabrication technologies and applications of OLEDs in their paper. V. K. Chandra et al. have covered both theoretical and experimental aspects in their paper, “Organic Light - Emitting Diodes and their Applications” in the most rigorous way. This Chapter describes the salient features of OLEDs and discusses the applications of OLEDs in displays and solid state lighting devices.Organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite materials have been of great interest for their extraordinary performances. Interaction between the polymer matrix and nanocrystalline fillers produces wonderful features, viz. thermal, magnetic, mechanical, electrical and optical properties to these materials. S.K. Tripathi et al. have reviewed the present status of II-VI polymer nanocomposites from the photoluminescence studies point of view in the 3rd Chapter. Electroluminescence in undoped and doped chalcogenide nanocrystals and nanocomposites is reviewed in 4th Chapter by Meera et al. Nanocrystalline powder samples of CdS, CdSe, ZnS and ZnSe nanocrystals and their composites with PVA and PVK have been prepared by chemical route and investigated in detail. Chapters 5 and 6 are contributed by RK Gartia on two important topics: “Thermoluminescence of Persistent Luminescent Materials” and “Design of Inorganic Scintillators: Role of Thermoluminescence”. The author has demonstrated the application of TL, by virtue of its inherent sensitivity coupled with its universal applicability, to investigate practically all semiconducting/inorganic materials in terms of their trap- spectroscopy.Chapter 7 by Rabiul Biswas deals with application of luminescence to earth and planetary sciences. The author discusses some landmarks and recent developments in this field of luminescence dating with stress on extending the dating range. Chapter 8 by Jain and Bøtter-Jensen is focused on the developments around the Risø-TL/OSL reader which is popular amongst the dating community. The 9th Chapter is added as a case study. The authors, JN Reddy and KVR Murthy, claim that the primary objective of their PC Controlled TL Reader is to bring out versatile TL instrumentation system and also to make it affordable to many of the researchers in the Universities and other areas, including Radio-therapy and Medical Physics.
This book is designed to provide lecture notes (theory) and experimental design of major concepts typically taught in most Mechanics of Materials courses in a sophomore- or junior-level Mechanical or Civil Engineering curriculum. Several essential concepts that engineers encounter in practice, such as statistical data treatment, uncertainty analysis, and Monte Carlo simulations, are incorporated into the experiments where applicable, and will become integral to each laboratory assignment. Use of common strain (stress) measurement techniques, such as strain gages, are emphasized. Application of basic electrical circuits, such as Wheatstone bridge for strain measurement, and use of load cells, accelerometers, etc., are employed in experiments. Stress analysis under commonly applied loads such as axial loading (compression and tension), shear loading, flexural loading (cantilever and four-point bending), impact loading, adhesive strength, creep, etc., are covered. LabVIEW software with relevant data acquisition (DAQ) system is used for all experiments. Two final projects each spanning 2‒3 weeks are included: (i) flexural loading with stress intensity factor determination and (ii) dynamic stress wave propagation in a slender rod and determination of the stress‒strain curves at high strain rates.

The book provides theoretical concepts that are pertinent to each laboratory experiment and prelab assignment that a student should complete to prepare for the laboratory. Instructions for securing off-the-shelf components to design each experiment and their assembly (with figures) are provided. Calibration procedure is emphasized whenever students assemble components or design experiments. Detailed instructions for conducting experiments and table format for data gathering are provided. Each lab assignment has a set of questions to be answered upon completion of experiment and data analysis. Lecture notes provide detailed instructions on how to use LabVIEW software for data gathering during the experiment and conduct data analysis.

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