Wave Propagation: From Electrons to Photonic Crystals and Left-Handed Materials

Princeton University Press
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This textbook offers the first unified treatment of wave propagation in electronic and electromagnetic systems and introduces readers to the essentials of the transfer matrix method, a powerful analytical tool that can be used to model and study an array of problems pertaining to wave propagation in electrons and photons. It is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students in physics, materials science, electrical and computer engineering, and mathematics, and is ideal for researchers in photonic crystals, negative index materials, left-handed materials, plasmonics, nonlinear effects, and optics.

Peter Markos and Costas Soukoulis begin by establishing the analogy between wave propagation in electronic systems and electromagnetic media and then show how the transfer matrix can be easily applied to any type of wave propagation, such as electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. The transfer matrix approach of the tight-binding model allows readers to understand its implementation quickly and all the concepts of solid-state physics are clearly introduced. Markos and Soukoulis then build the discussion of such topics as random systems and localized and delocalized modes around the transfer matrix, bringing remarkable clarity to the subject. Total internal reflection, Brewster angles, evanescent waves, surface waves, and resonant tunneling in left-handed materials are introduced and treated in detail, as are important new developments like photonic crystals, negative index materials, and surface plasmons. Problem sets aid students working through the subject for the first time.

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About the author

Peter Markos is a researcher at the Institute of Physics at the Slovak Academy of Sciences. Costas M. Soukoulis is Distinguished Professor of Physics at Iowa State University and senior physicist at Ames Laboratory. His books include Photonic Band Gap Materials and Photonic Crystals and Light Localization in the Twenty-First Century.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Apr 1, 2008
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Pages
376
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ISBN
9781400835676
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Applied
Mathematics / Discrete Mathematics
Science / Physics / General
Science / Waves & Wave Mechanics
Technology & Engineering / Electrical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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