The Navy of Edward VI and Mary I

Routledge
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The reigns of Edward VI and Mary I remain largely by-passed in naval history, yet it was a vital time for the administration of the navy and it saw the apprenticeship of many who would lead the service in Elizabeth's later years. This volume helps to fill the gap and includes all the extant Treasurer's and Victualler's accounts for the two reigns together with entries taken verbatim from the State Papers which augment the calendar summaries previously published, and correct a good many errors. In addition documents are printed here for the first time from a variety of archives in Britain and abroad.
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About the author

C.S. Knighton, Archivist of Clifton College, UK, and David Loades, Honorary Research Professor, University of Sheffield, UK
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Mar 3, 2016
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Pages
696
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ISBN
9781317023227
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Oceania
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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