Children Reading Picturebooks: Interpreting visual texts, Edition 2

Routledge
Free sample

Children Reading Pictures has made a huge impact on teachers, scholars and students all over the world. The original edition of this book described the fascinating range of children's responses to contemporary picturebooks, which proved that they are sophisticated readers of visual texts and are able to make sense of complex images on literal, visual and metaphorical levels. Through this research, the authors found that children are able to understand different viewpoints, analyse moods, messages and emotions, and articulate personal responses to picture books - even when they struggle with the written word.

The study of picturebooks and children’s responses to them has increased dramatically in the 12 years since the first edition was published. Fully revised with a review of the most recent theories and critical work related to picturebooks and meaning-making, this new edition demonstrates how vital visual literacy is to children's understanding and development. The second edition:

  • Includes three new case studies that address social issues, special needs and metafiction
  • Summarises key finding from research with culturally diverse children
  • Draws upon new research on response to digital picturebooks
  • Provides guidelines for those contemplating research on response to picturebooks

This book is essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate students of children’s literature as well as providing important reading for Primary and Early Years teachers, literacy co-ordinators and all those interested in picturebooks.

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About the author

Evelyn Arizpe is Senior Lecturer at the School of Education, University of Glasgow, UK.

Morag Styles

is Emeritus Professor and Fellow of Homerton College, Cambridge. She recently retired from the University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education, UK.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Nov 27, 2015
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Pages
238
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ISBN
9781317407607
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Elementary
Education / General
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / Arts & Humanities
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Art & Fear has attracted a remarkably diverse audience, ranging from beginning to accomplished artists in every medium, and including an exceptional concentration among students and teachers. The original Capra Press edition of Art & Fear sold 80,000 copies.

An excerpt:

Today, more than it was however many years ago, art is hard because you have to keep after it so consistently. On so many different fronts. For so little external reward. Artists become veteran artists only by making peace not just with themselves, but with a huge range of issues. You have to find your work...

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• popular aspects of Caribbean poetry, such as performance poetry;

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