Advent and Psychic Birth

Fisher King Press
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The Christian season of Advent, covering the span of about four weeks prior to Christmas, is rich with religious and psychological significance. In the darkest, shortest days of the year, people turn their thoughts to rebirth and the creation of new light. It is a time for psychic birth guiding us toward wider consciousness and a heightened experience of life. This yearning in human beings goes back to the primal roots of civilization. The prayers and liturgies of the Advent season echo the myths of winter solstice festivals and the ancient desire of people to return to the nurturing chaos of unformed matter. Advent prayers parallel the efforts of alchemists who strove to turn base metal into higher and more noble elements. Advent expresses a fundamental longing for transformation.
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About the author

Mariann Burke is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Boston. In addition to ‘Advent and Psychic Birth,’ she is the author of ‘Re-Imagining Mary: A Journey Through Art to the Feminine Self.’ Mariann holds degrees from the University of Pittsburgh, Andover-Newton Theological School and the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich and has done graduate work in scripture at Union Theological Seminary and La Salle University. She is a member of the Religious of the Sacred Heart.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fisher King Press
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Published on
Dec 1, 2014
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Pages
170
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ISBN
9781926715995
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Movements / Jungian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Artists plumb the depths of soul which Jung calls the collective unconscious, the inheritance of our ancestors' psychic responses to life's drama. In this sense the artist is priest, mediating between us and God. The artist introduces us to ourselves by inviting us into the world of image. We may enter this world to contemplate briefly or at length. Some paintings invite us back over and over again and we return, never tiring of them. It is especially these that lead us to the Great Mystery, beyond image. Re-Imagining Mary: A Journey through Art to the Feminine Self is about meeting the Cosmic Mary in image and imagination, the many facets of the Mary image that mirror both outer reality and inner feminine soul. Jungian analyst Mariann Burke offers personal reflections and suggests symbolic meanings in works by several artists including: Fra Angelico, Albrecht Durer, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Nicolas Poussin, Parmigianino, Duccio di Buoninsegna, Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, and Frederick Franck. Aspects of Mary explored include: Mary not only as Mother of God, a title from the Judeo-Christian tradition, but as Mother God, a title reaching back to an ancient longing for a Female Divinity. In western Christianity this Mary bears the titles and the qualities worshipped for thousands of years in the Female images of God and Goddess. These titles include Mary as Sorrowful One and as Primordial Mother. Recovering Mary both as light and dark Madonna plays a crucial role in humanity's search for a divinity who reflects soul. Also discussed is Mary as the sheltering Great Mother that Piero della Francesca suggest in the Madonna del Parto and Mater Misericodia. Frederick Franck's The Original Face and the Medieval Vierge Ouvrante also suggest this motif of Mary as Protector of the mystery of our common Origin. Franck's inspiration for his sculpture of Mary was the Buddhist koan-"What is your original face before you were born?" What is spirituality? What does it mean to grow spiritually and psychologically closer to the Feminine Self? How can we begin to see the "outer" image as a manifestation, a projection of the psyche? Can we be challenged by being "betwixt and between" a male dominated Church without a recognized female divinity where God is generally imagined external to the soul and a more feminine depth psychological approach to the Marian mystery and to the Feminine Self? Will we answer the call of the mystic within us? If so, how will we be changed?
Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the reader will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history. Completed just before his death by Jung and his associates, it is clearly addressed to the general reader.

Praise for Man and His Symbols

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his firsat attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public. . . . What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.”—Guardian

“Straighforward to read and rich in suggestion.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

“This book will be a resounding success for those who read it.”—Galveston News-Tribune

“A magnificent achievement.”—Main Currents

“Factual and revealing.”—Atlanta Times
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