Get- Popular English Verb

English Daily Use

Book 22
Manik Joshi
6
Free sample

This Book Covers The Following Topics:

1. ENGLISH VERB -- ‘GET’
2. Meanings of Main Verb ‘GET’
3. GET + THIRD FORM OF VERB
3A. Get + Third Form of Verb
3B. Have/Has + Got + Third Form of Verb
3C. Got + Third Form of Verb
3D. Had + Got + Third Form of Verb
3E. Will + Get + Third Form of Verb
3F. Will + Have + Got + Third Form of Verb
3G. Modal Verbs + Get + Third Form of Verb
3H. Getting + Third Form of Verb
3I. Verb + To + Get + Third Form of Verb
4. GET TO + FIRST FORM OF VERB
4A. Get To + First Form of Verb
4B. Got To + First Form of Verb
4C. Will + Get To + First Form of Verb
5. HAVE + GOT TO + FIRST FORM OF VERB
6. ‘GET’ + ADJECTIVE
7. ‘GET’ + USED TO
8. Use of ‘Get’ In Causative Sentences
9. English Idioms With ‘Get’
10. Phrasal Verbs With ‘Get’
11. Other Sentences With ‘Get’
12. Conjugation of Verb ‘Get’
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)
Exercises: 3(A) and 3(B)


Sample This:

1. ENGLISH VERB -- ‘GET’

Get is an irregular verb. Its three forms are as follows:

First Form (Base Form) -- GET
Second Form (Past Form) -- GOT
Third Form (Past Participle) -- GOT/GOTTEN

Present Perfect of ‘Get’ – Have/Has Got || Have/Has Gotten
Past Perfect of ‘Get’ -- Had Got || Had Gotten

Gotten (past participle form of ‘get’) is generally used in Spoken American English. Gotten is incorrect in British English.

-ING Form of ‘Get’ -- Getting
Infinitive of ‘Get’ -- To Get

IMPORTANT NOTE:
“Have/has got” is the ‘Present Perfect’ Form of ‘get’. But it is mainly used in the present indefinite (simple) tense. “Have/has got” is generally used with ‘simple present meaning’ to show characteristics, ownership, illnesses, and relationships.
‘Have got’ and ‘has got’ have the same meaning as ‘have’ and ‘has’ respectively. They can be used as present indefinite (simple) tenses.

Affirmative Sentences --
They have got computers. = They have computers.
He has got a computer. = He has a computer.

Negative Sentences --
They have not got computers. = They do not have computers.
He has not got a computer. = He does not have a computer.
Note:- Negative form of ‘have/has got’ is made by adding ‘not’ between ‘have/has’ and ‘got’; whereas, negative form of ‘have/has’ is made by using ‘do/does not’.

Interrogative Sentences --
Have they got computers? = Do they have computers?
Has he got a computer? = Does he have a computer?
Note:- Interrogative pattern of ‘have/has got’ is made by putting auxiliary verb ‘have/has’ before the subject; whereas Interrogative pattern of ‘have/has’ is made by putting auxiliary verb ‘Do/Does’ before the subject.

However, in past events you should prefer using ‘had’ instead of ‘had got’ ’ to show characteristics, ownership, illnesses, and relationships.
More Common -- They had computers. They did not have computers. Did they have computers?
Less Common -- They had got computers. They had not got computers. Had they got computers?

Also Note: Use of ‘have got’ and ‘has got’ in present perfect tenses:
Pattern: Have/has got + past participle of verb
A project has got stuck. || Many projects have got stuck.

And, in past perfect tenses you should use ‘had got’.
A project had got stuck. || Many projects had got stuck.


ALSO NOTE:
GOTTA - Very informal and non-standard way of referring to ‘have got to’ or ‘have got a’ in writing. This form is grammatically incorrect. Avoid using writing this form.

English Verb ‘Get’ can be used in a number of patterns and has lots of different uses and meanings.--
A. “Get” is used as a main verb with many different meanings.
B. “Get” is used in several idioms.
C. “Get” is used in several phrasal verbs.

Meanings of Main Verb ‘GET’

MOST COMMON MEANINGS OF “GET” AS A MAIN VERB ARE AS FOLLOWS:
to receive / to obtain or acquire (to gain, attain, achieve something) / to bring / to receive prison term / to receive broadcasts / to buy something / to earn / to receive marks or grade in an exam / to become affected by (a disease or bodily condition) / to be infected with an illness, etc. / to start doing something / to arrive/come/reach / to move to a particular direction or place / to use transport (to catch) / to answer (receive) the phone call / to capture somebody / to understand / to have / to memorize / to find out by calculation / to deliver / to prepare a meal, etc.

1. TO RECEIVE
We get assurance every time, but nothing has materialized.
I got the medal and the money.
I got an appointment letter today.
Flood-affected families got compensation.
We got some high-resolution images.
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About the author

Manik Joshi was born on Jan 26, 1979 at Ranikhet and is permanent resident of Haldwani, Kumaon zone of India. He is an Internet Marketer by profession. He is interested in domaining (business of buying and selling domain names), web designing (creating websites), and various online jobs (including 'self publishing'). He is science graduate with ZBC (zoology, botany, and chemistry) subjects. He is also an MBA (with specialization in marketing). He has done three diploma courses in computer too.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Manik Joshi
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Published on
Oct 25, 2014
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Pages
78
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ISBN
9781492743439
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Public Speaking
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This Book Covers The Following Topics:

A Big Myth
List of Prepositions
Ending a sentence with a preposition – About, Against, At, By, For, From, In, Into, Of, On, Out, To, Upon, With - Example Sentences
When to End a Sentence with a Preposition
Situation – 01 - Interrogative Sentences
Situation – 02 - Passive Voice Sentences
Situation – 03 - Infinitive Structures
Situation – 04 - Relative Clauses
Situation – 05 - Phrasal Verbs
How to Avoid Ending a Sentence with a Preposition
Option – 01 - Restructuring the Sentence
Option – 02 - Using a Different Word
Avoid Unnecessary Use of Prepositions
Additional Examples
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

Sample This:

A Big Myth

It is said we should avoid ending a sentence with a preposition. A preposition should be placed before a noun or a pronoun. The word preposition expresses “position before” so it is improper to place a preposition at the end! This is, however, not a rule. You can use a preposition to end a sentence with.

Here, you will learn when you can use a preposition at the end of a sentence and how you can avoid using a preposition at the end of a sentence.

As there is no hard and fast rule regarding use of a preposition at the end of a sentence, so whether you use it or not at the end of a sentence, it is your choice. But as most people avoid ‘excessive’ use of prepositions at the end of sentences, you can follow suit, and may use them only when they give strength to your language.

Some words (on, off, over, etc.) may be used as both prepositions and adverbs. However, everyone can’t easily differentiate between preposition and adverb. So, whenever they see these words at the end of sentences, they think that they are prepositions. As most of the people are averse to the idea of using prepositions at the end of sentences, they even don’t use these words as adverbs at the end of sentences.

Actually, it is a myth that you shouldn’t use preposition at the end of a sentence. Using a preposition at the end of a sentence is not grammatically incorrect. You can end your sentences with prepositions. Sometimes, using preposition at the end of a sentence seems better than using it in the middle or beginning of a sentence.



Ending a Sentence with a Preposition - ABOUT
An ad agency's job is to take a brand to consumers and communicate the proposition well to them, so that they understand what the brand is all about.
Could you tell me what he was on about?
For last 5 years, he has been part of the corruption in our country that we are angry about.
Governor said even clerical staff could easily address some of the complaints that students were approaching him about.
He warned her against commenting on things he is not authorized to speak about.
Her success is all everybody in the town is talking about.
How did the company come about?
How did this all come about?
I decided to leave my career, and concentrate my energies in an area which I was passionate about.
I do not know which video you are talking about.
Intimate details of his life have been flung about.
There are many healthcare centers worth talking about.
This is the player I told you about.
This is what the fight is about.
What are all these girls doing about?
What are you getting upset about?
What are you thinking about?
What did you want to read about?
What do they want to talk about?
Sentence Beginning With It/There/That/This; Useful words; Sentences With ‘Verb’ Be (Am, is, are, was, were); Sentences with Verb- Have (have, has, had); Sentences With Modal Verbs; Imperative/Interrogative/Negative Sentences; Sentences With Popular Past Verbs; Sentences With Popular Present Verbs; Various Daily Use Sentences | Sample this: he attracted attention. Bask in the winter sun. His world began spinning. Dawn broke. I cast my vote. I do a lot of self-talk. He evaded a direct reply. He felt numb. Soon train gathered speed. My heart was knocking wildly. She quietly nodded her assent. Opt for an independent living. Bus dashed right into the cart. I won’t spare him. Many people swam to safety. Then the crowed thickened. The flag unfurled. Capital wore a festive look. The news came as a shock. People will call you a liar. We can't go back on that now. Crime rate is soaring. He asked where I lived.


Sample This:

Popular Sentences in English -- I

Sentence Beginning With IT/THERE/THAT/THIS

IT-
It began to rain.
It has become tough to walk on these roads.
It is a bit lower than expected.
It is a clean and clear probe.
It is a problem of large magnitude.
It is all set to be a thing of the past.
It is an all-out Japanese effort.
It is easier to lose weight than gain it.
It is fourth lane from here.
It is hard not to be suspicious about this regime.
It is just not my day.
It is never too late to start life afresh.
It is not possible!
It is not that the police aren’t doing anything.
It is tantamount to discrimination.
It is time to awaken the voters.
It is tough to survive in the wild.
It is up to them to decide how to proceed.
It is very personal decision that we have taken.
It isn’t worth having it repaired.
It made my heart beat faster.
It seemed OK at the time.
It seems there is no administration in the state.
It should not only be done with honesty, but it should seem to be so.
It tastes something like apple.
It was a huge bang.
It was an experience I will cherish all my life.
It was bound to happen.
It was his third home trip in as many years.
It was not a favorable time to start a journey.
It was the fastest growing state for the second year.
It will be convenient for some people to not have me here.
It will not be too long until their names are whispered.
It will only upset her further.
It would create complications for him.

THERE-
There are many reasons for it.
There are no two opinions about it.
There are times when you are not in the mood to talk.
There are times when your best efforts are not good enough.
There has been a noticeable increase.
There have been several such instances in the past.
There is a cool breeze just before a rain storm.
There is an acute shortage of water.
There is general financial slowdown.
There is hardly any scope of reformation for them.
There is more than you know.
There is nothing that can be done to sort this out.
There seems political conspiracy behind it.
There was no such move at the moment.
There were security issues.
There will be no early elections.
There would be no fare hike.

THAT-
That had happened long before.
That has been our consistent stand.
That is for sure.
That is no longer the case now.
That money would bring big relief to family.
That part of sting operation was stage managed.
That way, there will not be any ill feelings.
That’s how far I was from reality.
That’s not me saying it.

THIS-
This envelope is under-stamped.
This incident has made him stone-like.
This is a clear case of corruption.
This is no way to deal with a crisis.
This is no way to live.
This is not the first time he has achieved this feat.
This is off-season for us but sales continue to be normal.
This is one list; state will be ashamed to top.
This is something to do in advance.
This is the most complained about university.
This is the third such incident within a week.
This issue stands concluded.
This project cost a lot of money.
This seems to be worrying him.
This year will be expensive till the end.

How to learn English words | sentences starting with a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y,z letters | daily conversation sentences containing key words | simple English sentences | improve English communication | most important words and sentences | Here is the sample:-- About-- This is what life is about. Bear-- Finally, the efforts bore fruit. Catch-- He was caught on camera. Each -- We each wish to rise. Evacuate-- They were evacuated to safety. Flee-- They fled the scene. Grow-- He grew his hair long. Hear-- We heard a loud thud. Jam-- I found the door jammed. Loss-- He didn’t lose a moment. Meet-- They met at agreed time. Need-- Home needs to be guarded. Offer-- He offered no opposition to a plan. Past-- He worked past midnight. Refuse-- He refused to vacate the room. Script-- He scripted history. Tell-- She tells her name Alice. Understand-- They understand me better. Value-- He has high moral values. Want-- We want to stay together. 

 

Sample This:

Common English Sentences -- A

About- It doesn’t matter who says what about me.
About- That’s what being American is all about.
About- They were going about their daily lives.
About- This is what life is about.
About- This training has been all about that.
About- We have nothing to feel defensive about.
About- What city was all about today?
Abuse- He was found guilty of abusing his office.
Accept- He accepted an opportunity with enthusiasm.
Accept- He accepted his invitation for birthday.
Accept- He accepted it without protest.
Account- Asia accounts for the maximum oral cancer cases.
Account- Lighting accounts for 20 percent of the total electricity demand.
Account- Our state accounts for 9 of 10 eggs exported.
Account- She gave the police a full account of the incident.
Account- The team gave a good account of themselves in the match.
Accuse- Protestors accused the state govt. of inaction.
Achieve- He achieved some measure of success.
Across- A wave of attacks across the country killed 95.
Across- Moonlight glittered across the coconut leaves.
Across- My house is just across the street.
Across- Police officers across ranks expressed shock.
Across- Red alert sounded across the state.
Across- She watched the incident from across the road.
Across- The blast has cut across class and gender.
Across – The government launched military drills across half the country.
Across- The issue is slowly becoming a matter of debate across villages in the country.
Across- We could also attack across the border.
Act- He acted in a street play.
Act- Heat acts on metals.
Act- I act from a sense of duty.
Act- My lawyer acts for me.
Act- You should act up to my advice.
Activity- It is quite unfortunate that such an inhuman activity is taking place here.
Add- He added his signature to the petition.
Address- President addressed a press conference.
Address- They received 25 objections and addressed all of them.
Administer- Administer anti-polio drops.
Admit- She was admitted with severe breathing problem.
Adopt- He adopted the look of Obama.
Advance- The mob advanced us shouting angrily.
Advice- I have a piece of advice for you.
After- Take medicine twice after the fever is down.
Agree- He agreed to act opposite me in the movie.
Agree- We agreed to another demand of him.
Ahead- Our team was ahead by two goals.
Ahead- Preparations for the festival begin ahead.
Aim- My remarks were not aimed at you.
Aim- The new bill aims at filling the gaps in the existing laws.
Alarm- It is nothing to be alarmed about.
Allocate- The government has allocated the funds.
Along- CM and Deputy CM were sworn in along with a 24-member cabinet by Governor.
Along- Enter the lane alongside the Newspaper office.
Along- He had come to the city along with his wife for sight-seeing a week ago.
Along- He was missing along with his servant.
Along- The sanctuary area runs along three states.
Among- From among those he prescribes medicines too are ministers.
Amount- Cartoon amounted to an “insult” to the icon.
Amount- It amounts to judicial indiscipline.
Amount- It amounts to violation of human and civil rights.
Anger- This angered driver and a clash ensued.
Answer- Nobody answered the repeated knocks.
Any- It was the funniest thing any of us have seen for ages.
Any- The situation is not any better in nearby villages.
Apart- Explosion tore apart a coach of a passenger train.
Appear- Blip appeared on Radar.
Appear- Efforts appeared to be getting nowhere.
Appear- He appeared calm.
Appear- He appeared unsteady on his feet.
Appear- News-item appeared in the national dailies.
Appear- She appeared most pretty thing of the world.
Appear- Ship appeared a huge black shadow to me.
Appear- The match appeared to have been fixed.
Appear- They wanted her to appear in advertisements.
Apply- She applied vermilion on her head.
Apply- I applied this on myself.
Approach- They approached a checkpoint.
Arise- A dispute arose between two groups over the sum of money won in gambling.
Arise- His behaviour aroused the suspicion of the security guards.
Arise- The only difficulties arose from language barriers.
Arise- The question does not arise.
Arise- They aroused other people’s suspicions.
Arm- Cops were armed with tear gas shells.
Ask- Goddess asked me for a boon.
Ask- He asked “uncomfortable” questions.
Ask- He asked her about her well-being.
Assess- A team of experts will assess the situation.
Assess- CM assessed the status of relief work.
Associate- He was in fear of her life and the life and safety of anyone associated with her.
Associate- People associate harmful or bad with the word bacteria.
Associate- Pink is associated with grace.
Assume- His remarks assume significance.
Assume- The meeting assumed great importance for student’s future.
Assume- The move assumed importance in the light of the incident.
Attach- We attach great importance to our health.
Attain- Their families had decided to wed them once they attained marriageable age.
Attempt- He attempted to answer all his questions.
Attempt- He was attempting to overtake another vehicle.
Attract- He attracted my attention.
Attribute- He attributed the bad state of parks to a lack of funds.
Authorize- I authorized him for payments.
Avenge- He wanted to avenge the humiliation he suffered.
Average- He is above average height for his age.
Avoid- He avoided a direct answer.
Avoid- She was upset because she thought he was avoiding her.
Avoid- They avoided looking at each other.
Awake- City awoke to a clear but a cold morning.
Awake- I awoke later on to the sound of my cell phone ringing.
Away- We were away so long.
Daily Use English Sentences in daily life related to various topics | Daily English Sentences – kitchen, two-wheeler, business, law and order, actions, time, polite expressions, phone,  passing away, medical, politics, natural disaster, weather, fire, miscellaneous topics

 

Sample This:

Part - 01 – Daily Use English Sentences -- KITCHEN

ADD
Add cauliflower.
Add cumin seeds. When crackling, add red chilies.
Add peas and mix well. Add remaining water. Stir once.
Gradually add half cup water to coriander and cumin powder, blending into a smooth paste.

BOIL
Boil water with seven basil leaves till the water turns dark.
Boil one cup of water. Add cheese cubes into it until they melt properly.
Boil vegetable until it is partly cooked.

BRING
Bring the sauce to simmer.
Bring the cooker to full pressure.
Bring to full pressure on high heat.
Bring to boil on high heat.
In a pan bring milk to boil.

‘COLOUR’
Fry till pale brown.
Fry to a golden brown.
The mutton has been browned.
Cut cheese into cubes and fried to a golden brown.
Fry till rice turn opaque.
It starts turning pink. It turns pinkish brown.
Heat oil and butter together till smoky.

COOK
Cook for about 2 minutes.
Cook for less time rather than more.
Cook vegetables in minimum oil.
Cook dish over medium-high heat on both sides.
What dishes are cooked today?
Cook till gravy is slightly thickened.
Cook till liquid dries up.
Cook without a lid on for 10 minutes before adding 100 gm each of diced carrots and onions.
His servants cooked the tastiest food possible.
Cooking process is barely a few minutes.
Overcooking ruins the taste.
Hours of open pot cooking are just reduced to mere minutes in pressure cooker.
Slow down or speed up cooking by either cutting the vegetables thickly or thinly.
Indian cooking makes liberal use of coconut.
Art of cooking lies in the selection and combination of spices rather than their quantity.
Mention of cooking makes one think of rich aromatic foods.

CUT
Cut potatoes into four pieces each lengthwise.
Cut square pieces of sweets.
Cut the mango into slices.
Cut as desired or as per recipe requirement.
Cut the loaf into thick slices.
Cut the tomatoes in half.
Cut in halves.
With a sharp knife, cut away peel.

DRAIN
Drain off cooking liquid and reserve.
Drain off excess oil leaving one cup in cooker.
Drain the water.

DROP
Drop the cherries into the bowl, seeds and stems into a large pan.

DRY
Drain the water. Dry potatoes by shaking pan over low heat.
Dry it before use.
The dry chicken tastes best with chapattis while curry type goes well with rice.

FRY
Fry it on both sides.
In many dishes, frying before pressure-cooking is essential.
Fry one cup vermicelli in a small quantity of butter till light brown.
Boil 6 cups of milk and cook the fried vermicelli in it.

GRIND
Grind ginger into paste.
Grind together ginger and garlic into a paste.
Grind together cloves and cinnamon into a powder.
Prefer to use whole spices and grind them fresh each time in a blender.


HEAT
For tempering, heat oil in cooker for about 2 minutes.
Heat 2 tablespoon oil in a pan for about 1 minute.
Heat 3 spoons of water in a non-stick pan.
Heat in skillet over low heat with two tablespoons oil.
Heat up a pressure cooker.
How much heat? High, low, medium
Set the microwave to a low/high/medium heat
Reduce heat and cook for 3 minutes.
Reduce heat from high to medium (or low).
Turn off heat.
Return the pan to heat and stir for a few minutes.

Around 3000 daily life sentences, the most common words: after, against, all, around, away, back, before, call, carry, come, continue, down, ever, fall, give, go, hold, into, just, keep, lead, leave, let, lie/lay, like, look, make, name, once, off, on, out, over, pull, push, put, quality, remain, run, set, since, stand, take, through, throw, turn, up, upon, value, way | sample this: around -- flames flared around the stage. Aromas swirled around the room. Blue papers cut in rough triangles struck around the camp. He went around the lake in a motor boat. Houses, cars tossed around like toys. The dark or brown puffs of clouds were scattered around in the sky. They drove around in the city. Reporters rallied around her. Reporters struck around. I have spun around 360 degrees.  They later went around damaging property. 


Sample This:

01 – English Sentences -- After

Period (a particular length of time) + After
[This Pattern Is Used To Denote “Following Something In Time”]
Area was cordoned off an hour after the incident.
A picture was released a day after the attack.
Statement came 10 days after police claim.
The committee was formed two days after expose.
She had gone missing a few days after her husband was kidnapped.
He was saved a few days after other members were rescued.
She was killed weeks after returning from years in exile.
The shooting came less than a year after a massacre at main market.
That was more than 10 years after we had seen each other last.
She received a call soon after at her residence.
Soon after being informed by people, police swung into action.
Chopper collided mid-air shortly after take-off from an air base here.
The satellite started malfunctioning shortly after its deployment in orbit.
People will remember the song long after we are gone.
A week after abducted executive rescued, city has been rocked by abduction.
Three months after she took over reins of the state, she fulfilled her poll promises.
Two days after she got married, a 22-year old woman won the prestigious award.
Three days after hundred patients were treated, fifty more were admitted.

Noun + After + Noun
[This pattern is used to show something happens many times or continuously.]
He missed opportunity after opportunity.
Village has been caught in controversy after controversy.

You Can Also Use The Following Patterns:
One + Noun + After + Another
He missed one opportunity after another.
Village has been caught in one controversy after another.
The industry at large has faced one pain after another.
He indulged in one scam after another.

One After The Other
He established loyalty with three persons one after the other.
Events are taking place one after the other.
Many enemies came into his life one after the other.
One after the other, the survivors came out, each better than the other.
There were false allegations one after the other.

Two Events
Second Event (Simple Past) + After + First Event (Past Perfect)
I returned after he had gone.
He came after night had fallen.
I reached after the train had already left.

Others
She named his daughter after Lincoln.
The scheme (was) named after Party founder.
Indian NSG was modelled after their UK’s SAS.
My dog went after the thief.
Passengers said they heard a loud explosion after which the bus hurtled down.

This Book Covers The Following Topics:

A Big Myth
List of Prepositions
Ending a sentence with a preposition – About, Against, At, By, For, From, In, Into, Of, On, Out, To, Upon, With - Example Sentences
When to End a Sentence with a Preposition
Situation – 01 - Interrogative Sentences
Situation – 02 - Passive Voice Sentences
Situation – 03 - Infinitive Structures
Situation – 04 - Relative Clauses
Situation – 05 - Phrasal Verbs
How to Avoid Ending a Sentence with a Preposition
Option – 01 - Restructuring the Sentence
Option – 02 - Using a Different Word
Avoid Unnecessary Use of Prepositions
Additional Examples
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

Sample This:

A Big Myth

It is said we should avoid ending a sentence with a preposition. A preposition should be placed before a noun or a pronoun. The word preposition expresses “position before” so it is improper to place a preposition at the end! This is, however, not a rule. You can use a preposition to end a sentence with.

Here, you will learn when you can use a preposition at the end of a sentence and how you can avoid using a preposition at the end of a sentence.

As there is no hard and fast rule regarding use of a preposition at the end of a sentence, so whether you use it or not at the end of a sentence, it is your choice. But as most people avoid ‘excessive’ use of prepositions at the end of sentences, you can follow suit, and may use them only when they give strength to your language.

Some words (on, off, over, etc.) may be used as both prepositions and adverbs. However, everyone can’t easily differentiate between preposition and adverb. So, whenever they see these words at the end of sentences, they think that they are prepositions. As most of the people are averse to the idea of using prepositions at the end of sentences, they even don’t use these words as adverbs at the end of sentences.

Actually, it is a myth that you shouldn’t use preposition at the end of a sentence. Using a preposition at the end of a sentence is not grammatically incorrect. You can end your sentences with prepositions. Sometimes, using preposition at the end of a sentence seems better than using it in the middle or beginning of a sentence.



Ending a Sentence with a Preposition - ABOUT
An ad agency's job is to take a brand to consumers and communicate the proposition well to them, so that they understand what the brand is all about.
Could you tell me what he was on about?
For last 5 years, he has been part of the corruption in our country that we are angry about.
Governor said even clerical staff could easily address some of the complaints that students were approaching him about.
He warned her against commenting on things he is not authorized to speak about.
Her success is all everybody in the town is talking about.
How did the company come about?
How did this all come about?
I decided to leave my career, and concentrate my energies in an area which I was passionate about.
I do not know which video you are talking about.
Intimate details of his life have been flung about.
There are many healthcare centers worth talking about.
This is the player I told you about.
This is what the fight is about.
What are all these girls doing about?
What are you getting upset about?
What are you thinking about?
What did you want to read about?
What do they want to talk about?
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

How to Start a Sentence
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘AS’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘AFTER’ and ‘BEFORE’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘BY’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘FOR/FROM
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘IF’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘OF/ON/OUT’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘TO’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘IN’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘WITH’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘QUESTION WORDS’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘ING’ FORM of VERBS
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘PAST PARTICIPLES’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘-LY Words’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘PRONOUNS’
Start a Sentence – Miscellaneous
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

Sample This:

There are different ways to start a sentence in English. Using pronoun (I, we, you, they, he, she, it) is the most popular way to begin a sentence. But there are many other words which are widely used to start a sentence. They might be question words (what, where, etc.). They might be words formed from verbs, ending in –ing, -ed, -en, etc. Besides, words such as ‘to’ ‘in’ ‘with’, ‘if’, ‘after’ are also used to begin a sentence.
Here, you will learn various words and phrases to start a sentence with.

Important Note:
Starting a sentence with ‘and’ or ‘but’ is correct or not!

Using ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence is generally considered grammatically Incorrect. But there is no hard and fast rule in this regard. So, you can use ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence. But avoid excessive use of these words to begin a sentence. Use these words in the beginning of a sentence only when they really give strength to your language.

Note: It is said that a sentence should not be begun with a conjunction of any kind, especially one of the FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so). But this is not hard and fast rule. Particularly in spoken English, starting a sentence with ‘And’ or ‘But’ is common.


How to start a sentence -- Using ‘AS’

As a matter of fact no notice was given to anyone.
As a policeman myself, I am aware of all the laws.
As against last time four days, the fair will last for five days this year.
As always, he won the match.
As an interim arrangement, we directed the authorities not to return the land.
As fate would have it, he crossed the international border.
As for David, he is doing fine.
As he got busy, she picked up his son.
As he grew older, he developed his communications skills.
As if the bad power situation in the city wasn’t enough, the hike in power tariff has come as the last straw for residents.
As in the past, party president distanced herself from the government’s unpopular decision.
As long as here is violence by unruly mobs, use of police force is inevitable.
As often happened, he forgot to send me reply.
As part of the deal, they will hand-over control of five west bank towns.
As penance, he vowed to never scold any kid ever again.
As per his version, nobody had got injured in the incident.
As per rules, the same bill should be passed by the two Houses of the Parliament before it is sent to the President for his signature and promulgation for implementation.
As sanitary workers are absent on most of the days, sweeping of that road is also irregular resulting in trash along the road.
As the bus was nearing, / As the bus neared him, he moved aside.
As the day progressed, over a hundred men protestors gathered at the office.
As the electric cables are hanging loosely, it may anytime lead to major accident if any passer-by comes into contact.
As the mercury levels are dropping each day, difficulties for the poor are constantly rising.
As the war widened, they had to leave the city.
As we progresses, it is going to become more and more difficult.
As you know, I have sent him a letter.
This Book Covers the Following Topics:

Transitional Expressions -- Definition
Transitional Expressions – Punctuation Rules
01. Transitional Expressions -- Addition
02. Transitional Expressions -- Cause and Effect
03. Transitional Expressions -- Concession
04. Transitional Expressions -- Condition
05. Transitional Expressions -- Consequence
06. Transitional Expressions -- Contrast
07. Transitional Expressions -- Dismissal
08. Transitional Expressions -- Illustration
09. Transitional Expressions -- Emphasis
10. Transitional Expressions -- Exception
11. Transitional Expressions -- Explanation
12. Transitional Expressions -- Generalization
13. Transitional Expressions -- Location
14. Transitional Expressions -- Purpose
15. Transitional Expressions -- Quantifier
16. Transitional Expressions -- Reference
17. Transitional Expressions -- Sequence
18. Transitional Expressions – Similarity
19. Transitional Expressions -- Summary
20. Transitional Expressions -- Time
Exercise: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercise: 2(A) to 2(C)


SAMPLE THIS:

Transitional Expressions -- Definition

Meaning of ‘Transition’ -- to go from one point to another
“Transitional Expressions” = “Transitional Words” + “Transitional Phrases”
“Transitional (or Transition) Words” are also known as “connecting words”, “linking words” or “signal words“
“Transitional (or Transition) Phrases” are also known as “connecting phrases”, “linking phrases” or “signal phrases“

“Transitional Expressions” (also “Transitions”) could be defined as follows:
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ are words or phrases that provide bridges between sentences, parts of sentences, paragraphs and sections.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ connect and relate sentences and paragraphs.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ signal the relationship between sentences and paragraphs.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ state the connections between ideas.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ help carry over a thought from one part of a sentence to another, from one sentence to another, from one paragraph to another, from one section to another, or from one idea to another.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ connect ideas from sentence to sentence and paragraph to paragraph.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ are placed in the beginning, middle, or end of the sentences/paragraphs to explain connections between two or more ideas.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ help carry over a thought from one idea to another.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ produce clearer expression, by eliminating the excessive use of such words as ‘and’, ‘but’, ‘for’ ‘nor’, ‘or’ ‘so’ ‘yet’, etc.

Choosing Transitional Expression --
Some transitional words and transitional phrases belong to more than one category. A transitional expression can change the whole meaning of a sentence. Therefore, you should choose the transition that best conveys your meaning. You should also avoid repetition and use different transition words or phrases in the same category if necessary.

Placing transitional words:
There are three options for placing transitional words:
• The beginning of a sentence [Most common]
• The middle of a sentence
• The end of a sentence [Least Common]

Example:
Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Furthermore, customers can also avail for an additional year of warranty. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ at the beginning of a sentence]

Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Customers, furthermore, can also avail for an additional year of warranty. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ in the middle of a sentence]

Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Customers can also avail for an additional year of warranty, furthermore. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ in the end of a sentence]
THIS BOOK CONTAINS MEANINGS OF MORE THAN 3400 ADVANCED ENGLISH WORDS (including phrasal verbs and idioms).

Learn Difficult English Words & Their Meanings

Sample This:

("sb" implies somebody, "sth" implies something)

abate to become, or make sth less strong
abed in bed
aberrant not socially acceptable
abet to help, or encourage sb to do sth wrong
in abeyance not being used for a period of time
ablutions act of washing yourself
aboard on a ship, plane, bus etc.
abode where sb lives
abolition ending of sth
abominate to feel hatred, or disgust
abomination extremely unpleasant, disgusting
abortive unsuccessful
above board legal and honest; in a legal and honest way
abridge to make book, etc. shorter
absent minded forgetful
abstainer who chooses not to vote, who never drinks alcohol
abstruse difficult to understand
abundant plentiful
abysmal extremely bad
abyss deep wide space, or hole that seems to have no bottom
accede to agree, to become king, or queen
accommodating willing to help, obliging
accomplish to achieve sth
in accord with sb/sth in agreement with
accord with sth to agree with sth
accountable responsible
accoutrements pieces of equipment for a particular activity
accredited officially recognized
accrue to increase over a period of time
accursed suffering from a curse, or black magic
ace person who is very good at doing sth
Achilles heel weak point in sb's character attacked by other people
acme peak
acquaintance with sb slight friendship
make sb's acquaintance to meet sb first time
acquiesce to accept sth, even if you do not agree
acrimonious bitter
acrobat rope dancer
acronym a word formed using initial letters of other words
act up to behave badly
acumen ability to understand and decide things quickly
ad hominem against person's character
ad nauseam again and again in boring and annoying way
Adam's apple lump at the front of the throat
adamantine very strong and impossible to break
add up to seem reasonable
add-on a thing that is added to sth else
adieu goodbye
ad-infinitum for ever
adjourn to postpone
adjudicate to make official decision
adjure to order sb to do sth
Adonis extremely attractive young man
adorable attractive
adoration great love, or worship
adore to love very much, to like very much
adrenalin hormone produced in the body due to excitement, fear, or anger
adulation excessive praise
the advent of sb/sth coming of invention, etc.
adventitious happening by accident; not planned
advisable sensible
advise sb of sth to inform
advisory official warning
aeon thousands of years
aerodrome small airport
aesthete who love art and beautiful things
affaire love affair
affectation behaviour, action to impress other people
affectionate loving
affections person's feelings of love
affective connected with emotions, attitudes
affliction pain and suffering, or sth that causes it
afforestation process of planting areas of land with trees
aficionado who likes a particular subject, etc. very much and knows a lot about it
afloat floating on water
afoot being planned
afore mentioned mentioned earlier
aftermath situation existing after a war, an accident, etc.
her mouth was agape wide open, because of surprise or shock
come of age to become mature
age of consent legal age to have sex
aggrandizement increase in the power, or importance of a person, or country
aggravate to worsen
agonize over sth to spend a long time thinking and worrying about sth
agreeable pleasant and easy to like
aggrieved feeling that you have been treated unfairly
aghast horrified
ahead of earlier than
agog excited
Sentence Beginning With It/There/That/This; Useful words; Sentences With ‘Verb’ Be (Am, is, are, was, were); Sentences with Verb- Have (have, has, had); Sentences With Modal Verbs; Imperative/Interrogative/Negative Sentences; Sentences With Popular Past Verbs; Sentences With Popular Present Verbs; Various Daily Use Sentences | Sample this: he attracted attention. Bask in the winter sun. His world began spinning. Dawn broke. I cast my vote. I do a lot of self-talk. He evaded a direct reply. He felt numb. Soon train gathered speed. My heart was knocking wildly. She quietly nodded her assent. Opt for an independent living. Bus dashed right into the cart. I won’t spare him. Many people swam to safety. Then the crowed thickened. The flag unfurled. Capital wore a festive look. The news came as a shock. People will call you a liar. We can't go back on that now. Crime rate is soaring. He asked where I lived.


Sample This:

Popular Sentences in English -- I

Sentence Beginning With IT/THERE/THAT/THIS

IT-
It began to rain.
It has become tough to walk on these roads.
It is a bit lower than expected.
It is a clean and clear probe.
It is a problem of large magnitude.
It is all set to be a thing of the past.
It is an all-out Japanese effort.
It is easier to lose weight than gain it.
It is fourth lane from here.
It is hard not to be suspicious about this regime.
It is just not my day.
It is never too late to start life afresh.
It is not possible!
It is not that the police aren’t doing anything.
It is tantamount to discrimination.
It is time to awaken the voters.
It is tough to survive in the wild.
It is up to them to decide how to proceed.
It is very personal decision that we have taken.
It isn’t worth having it repaired.
It made my heart beat faster.
It seemed OK at the time.
It seems there is no administration in the state.
It should not only be done with honesty, but it should seem to be so.
It tastes something like apple.
It was a huge bang.
It was an experience I will cherish all my life.
It was bound to happen.
It was his third home trip in as many years.
It was not a favorable time to start a journey.
It was the fastest growing state for the second year.
It will be convenient for some people to not have me here.
It will not be too long until their names are whispered.
It will only upset her further.
It would create complications for him.

THERE-
There are many reasons for it.
There are no two opinions about it.
There are times when you are not in the mood to talk.
There are times when your best efforts are not good enough.
There has been a noticeable increase.
There have been several such instances in the past.
There is a cool breeze just before a rain storm.
There is an acute shortage of water.
There is general financial slowdown.
There is hardly any scope of reformation for them.
There is more than you know.
There is nothing that can be done to sort this out.
There seems political conspiracy behind it.
There was no such move at the moment.
There were security issues.
There will be no early elections.
There would be no fare hike.

THAT-
That had happened long before.
That has been our consistent stand.
That is for sure.
That is no longer the case now.
That money would bring big relief to family.
That part of sting operation was stage managed.
That way, there will not be any ill feelings.
That’s how far I was from reality.
That’s not me saying it.

THIS-
This envelope is under-stamped.
This incident has made him stone-like.
This is a clear case of corruption.
This is no way to deal with a crisis.
This is no way to live.
This is not the first time he has achieved this feat.
This is off-season for us but sales continue to be normal.
This is one list; state will be ashamed to top.
This is something to do in advance.
This is the most complained about university.
This is the third such incident within a week.
This issue stands concluded.
This project cost a lot of money.
This seems to be worrying him.
This year will be expensive till the end.

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