Our Fathers: Making Black Men

Universal-Publishers
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Many people don’t understand why black lives must matter and why the racial divide seems to be taking the country back 50 years. Like the mythical Sankofa bird, the answer to what’s missing now lies in what existed before. Our Fathers: Making Black Men focuses on one block of St. Louis in the mid-20th century, where African American businessmen living the American Dream also created a sense of community for boys in that neighborhood. Lincoln I. Diuguid, a PhD graduate of Cornell University in chemistry, anchored the block with Du-Good Chemical Laboratories & Manufacturers. The chemistry the book reveals isn’t rocket science, it’s just the lost formula of community engagement. Men like Doc gave boys on the street jobs and a strong work ethic. They did it through sharing the African American narrative of triumphs and tragedies. They pushed the boys to higher expectations and to be the long-held hope and dreams of their forbearers, who were slaves. The black men as mentors emphasized the importance of education and helped prepare the African American boys to be men. This book brings to life an unreported but significant phenomenon that black businesses played during the Great Migration of African Americans from the South. Our Fathers should be required reading for people who want to reverse the despair, improve public education, blow up the school-to-prison pipeline and end hopelessness in America’s cities.
 
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About the author

Lewis W. Diuguid is the recipient of the 2017 Louis M. Lyons Award for Conscience and Integrity in Journalism at Harvard University. With the honor, he was named a 2017 Knight Visiting Fellow, at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard. Diuguid was an editorial board member and columnist with The Kansas City Star until October 2016. He started with the newspaper as a reporter/photographer in May 1977 after graduating from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. He is the author of A Teacher’s Cry: Expose the Truth About Education Today (2004) and Discovering the Real America: Toward a More Perfect Union (2007). He is a founding member and president of the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists. He is the winner of many awards, including the 2000 Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Universal-Publishers
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Published on
Mar 15, 2017
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Pages
242
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ISBN
9781627340991
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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