Billion-Dollar Fish: The Untold Story of Alaska Pollock

University of Chicago Press
2
Free sample

Alaska pollock is everywhere. If you’re eating fish but you don’t know what kind it is, it’s almost certainly pollock. Prized for its generic fish taste, pollock masquerades as crab meat in california rolls and seafood salads, and it feeds millions as fish sticks in school cafeterias and Filet-O-Fish sandwiches at McDonald’s. That ubiquity has made pollock the most lucrative fish harvest in America—the fishery in the United States alone has an annual value of over one billion dollars. But even as the money rolls in, pollock is in trouble: in the last few years, the pollock population has declined by more than half, and some scientists are predicting the fishery’s eventual collapse. In Billion-Dollar Fish, Kevin M. Bailey combines his years of firsthand pollock research with a remarkable talent for storytelling to offer the first natural history of Alaska pollock. Crucial to understanding the pollock fishery, he shows, is recognizing what aspects of its natural history make pollock so very desirable to fish, while at the same time making it resilient, yet highly vulnerable to overfishing. Bailey delves into the science, politics, and economics surrounding Alaska pollock in the Bering Sea, detailing the development of the fishery, the various political machinations that have led to its current management, and, perhaps most important, its impending demise. He approaches his subject from multiple angles, bringing in the perspectives of fishermen, politicians, environmentalists, and biologists, and drawing on revealing interviews with players who range from Greenpeace activists to fishing industry lawyers. Seamlessly weaving the biology and ecology of pollock with the history and politics of the fishery, as well as Bailey’s own often raucous tales about life at sea, Billion-Dollar Fish is a book for every person interested in the troubled relationship between fish and humans, from the depths of the sea to the dinner plate.
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About the author

Kevin M. Bailey is a senior scientist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and affiliate professor at the University of Washington.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
May 15, 2013
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Pages
280
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ISBN
9780226022482
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animals / Fish
Nature / General
Science / Life Sciences / Marine Biology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Annual Yearbook to Provide Fisheries Statistics

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Sources of Data
Information in this report came from many sources. Field offices of NMFS, with the generous cooperation of the coastal states and Regional Fishery Information Networks, collected and compiled data on U.S. commercial landings and processed fishery products.

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Data in this publication are considered to be preliminary and are subject to revision as better information becomes available and updates are made by our regional partners. For the most current data please visit the data queries pages on our website: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/commercial-fisheries/index.

Updated and Current volume: Fisheries of the United States 2015 can be found here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/003-020-00202-1

Previous volume editions for comparisons:
Fisheries of the United States, 2012 can be found here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/003-020-00197-1

Fishery Bulletin print subscription includes articles written by scientists of NOAA, the Smithsonian Institution, and U.S. universities and wildlife agencies from around the world can be found here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/703-023-00000-2?ctid=

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