Arctic Transitions – Witness to change– Young ambassadors in Nunavut

Luc Hardy
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Publisher
Luc Hardy
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Published on
Dec 31, 2008
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Pages
143
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ISBN
9780974608020
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Language
English
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This content is DRM protected.
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A Year with Nature is an almanac like none you’ve ever seen: combining science and aesthetics, it is a daily affirmation of the extraordinary richness of biodiversity and our enduring beguilement by its beauty. With a text by herpetologist and natural history writer Marty Crump and a cornucopia of original illustrations by Bronwyn McIvor, this quirky quotidian reverie gazes across the globe, media, and time as it celebrates date-appropriate natural topics ranging from the founding of the National Park Service to annual strawberry, garlic, shrimp, hummingbird, and black bear festivals.

With Crump, we mark the publication of classics like Carson’s Silent Spring and White’s Charlotte’s Web, and even the musical premiere of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake. We note the discovery of the structure of DNA and the mountain gorilla, the rise of citizen science projects, and the work of people who’ve shaped how we view and protect nature—from Aristotle to E. O. Wilson. Some days feature US celebrations, like National Poinsettia Day and National Cat Day; others highlight country-specific celebrations, like Australia’s Wombat Day and Thailand’s Monkey Buffet Festival, during which thousands of macaques feast on an ornately arranged spread of fruits and vegetables. Crump also highlights celebrations that span borders, from World Wildlife Conservation Day to International Mountain Day and global festivities for snakes, sea turtles, and chocolate. Interweaving fascinating facts on everything from jellyfish bodies to monthly birth flowers with folkloric entries featuring the Loch Ness Monster, unicorns, and ancient Greek, Roman, and Egyptian mythology, the almanac is as exhaustive as it is enchanting.

A Year with Nature celebrates the wonder and beauty of our natural world as we have expressed it in visual arts, music, literature, science, natural history, and everyday experience. But more than this, the almanac’s vignettes encourage us to contemplate how we can help ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy the landscapes and rich biodiversity we so deeply cherish.
The Unicoi Mountains straddle the Tennessee-North Carolina state line just south of the Great Smoky Mountains, separated from the latter mountains only by the Little Tennessee River. Extending from the Little Tennessee River southward to the Hiwassee River, the Unicois are a southern segment of the high Unaka ridge that forms the western escarpment of the southern Appalachians. The Snowbird Mountains are included with the Unicois because they are connected like a spur ridge to the Unicois. The Unicois have been isolated and difficult to access until the completion in 1996 of the forty-two-mile-long, superbly scenic Cherohala Skyway that courses along the highest ridges of the Unicois at elevations up to 5,390 feet and provides outstanding views of forested mountains. The Unicoi Mountains have been relatively undisturbed by human development since most of the land is publicly owned and managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The Unicois harbor many diverse natural treasures that are hidden from the casual observer. Along with his personal observations, the author describes and synthesizes the results of scientific research on the natural assets of the Unicois, including intensive surveys of plants and animals in certain areas, the results of which have often been reported only in places where the general public cannot easily access them. The authors purpose in writing the book is to share with others what he has learned about the special natural features (landscape, geology, climate, flora, fungi, and fauna) of the Unicois and their historical rootswith the hope of inspiring others to enjoy, cherish, and conserve them. Unicoi Unity also reviews the history of the effects of humans on the Unicoi ecosystem and anticipates future challenges.
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