Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development

University of Chicago Press
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Modern developed nations are rich and politically stable in part because their citizens are free to form organizations and have access to the relevant legal resources. Yet in spite of the advantages of open access to civil organizations, it is estimated that eighty percent of people live in countries that do not allow unfettered access. Why have some countries disallow the formation of organizations as part of their economic and political system?

The contributions to Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development seek to answer this question through an exploration of how developing nations throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany, made the transition to allowing their citizens the right to form organizations. The transition, contributors show, was not an easy one. Neither political changes brought about by revolution nor subsequent economic growth led directly to open access. In fact, initial patterns of change were in the opposite direction, as political coalitions restricted access to specific organizations for the purpose of maintaining political control. Ultimately, however, it became clear that these restrictions threatened the foundation of social and political order. Tracing the path of these modern civil societies, Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development is an invaluable contribution to all interested in today’s developing countries and the challenges they face in developing this organizational capacity.
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About the author

Naomi R. Lamoreaux is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University and a research associate of the NBER. John Joseph Wallis is professor of economics at the University of Maryland and a research associate of the NBER.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Dec 1, 2017
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Pages
448
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ISBN
9780226426532
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / General
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / International / Economics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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"EXPONENTIAL ORGANIZATIONS should be required reading for anyone interested in the ways exponential technologies are reinventing best practices in business." —Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering at Google

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