Handbook of Youth Mentoring: Edition 2

SAGE Publications
Free sample

This thoroughly updated Second Edition of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring presents the only comprehensive synthesis of current theory, research, and practice in the field of youth mentoring. Editors David L. DuBois and Michael J. Karcher gather leading experts in the field to offer critical and informative analyses of the full spectrum of topics that are essential to advancing our understanding of the principles for effective mentoring of young people. This volume includes twenty new chapter topics and eighteen completely revised chapters based on the latest research on these topics. Each chapter has been reviewed by leading practitioners, making this handbook the strongest bridge between research and practice available in the field of youth mentoring.
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About the author

David L. DuBois, Ph.D., is a Professor of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his doctorate in clinical-community psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. DuBois has conducted extensive research on youth mentoring with funding from a variety of sources, including the National Institutes of Health, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the Institute of Education Sciences. His most recent research includes a comprehensive update of his ground-breaking meta-analytic review of youth mentoring program effectiveness first published more than a decade ago. He is also co-author of After-School Centers and Youth Development: Case Studies of Success and Failure (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Dr. DuBois is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Society for Community Research and Action and a past Distinguished Fellow of the William T. Grant Foundation. He consults widely to mentoring programs nationally and internationally.

Michael J. Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He received a doctorate in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He conducts research on school-based and cross-age peer mentoring as well as on adolescent connectedness and pair counseling. He currently conducts the Study of Mentoring in the Learning Environment (SMILE), which is a three-year research project funded by the William T. Grant Foundation to examine the effects of school-based mentoring.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications
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Published on
Apr 30, 2013
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Pages
600
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ISBN
9781483309811
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Counseling / General
Psychology / Developmental / Child
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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What does mentoring really mean? What can be achieved through mentor relationships?
This timely book examines one of the fastest growing social movements of our time. As millions of volunteers worldwide continue to add to the mentoring phenomenon, the need for this authoritative text becomes increasingly evident. It capably traces the history of mentoring, unravelling the many myths that surround it, with a combination of intellectual rigour, insight and lucid discussions.
The author draws upon detailed case studies, providing a unique and vivid account of mentoring through the voices of the participants themselves. These eye-opening narratives reveal the complex power dynamics of the mentor relationship, giving the reader the chance to:
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The strength of this book lies in the author's ability to present complex material in a highly readable form. It offers a radically new theoretical analysis of mentoring, based on award-winning research, arguing that mentoring cannot be separated from the wider power relations that surround those involved. For anyone with a professional commitment or link to mentoring, including managers, practitioners and policy-makers, this is an essential, incomparable read.
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Drawing on work in the fields of psychology and personal relations, Rhodes provides concrete suggestions for improving mentoring programs and creating effective, enduring mentoring relationships with youth.

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