Fab: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney

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Howard Sounes, the bestselling author of Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan and Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life, turns his considerable reporting and storytelling skills to one of the most famous, talented—and wealthiest—men alive: Paul McCartney.

Fab is the first exhaustive biography of the legendary musician; it tells Sir Paul's whole life story, from childhood to present day, from working-class Liverpool beginnings to the cultural phenomenon that was The Beatles to his many solo incarnations.

Fab is the definitive portrait of McCartney, a man of contradictions and a consummate musician far more ruthless, ambitious, and moody than his relaxed public image implies. Based on original research and more than two hundred new interviews, Fab also reveals for the first time the full story of his two marriages, romances, family feuds, phenomenal wealth, and complex relationships with his fellow ex-Beatles.

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About the author

Howard Sounes is the bestselling author of meticulously researched and revelatory books including Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan and Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life. He lives in London.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Da Capo Press
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Published on
Oct 26, 2010
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Pages
656
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ISBN
9780306819384
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Music
Music / Genres & Styles / Rock
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The long-awaited memoir of the legendary drummer's life and times in the bands Small Faces, Faces, and The Who.

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