The Beginner's Cow: Memories of a Volga German from Kansas

Truman State University Press
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At the age of seven, Loren Schmidtberger was assigned to a beginner's cow—the gentlest cow in the herd and the easiest for a child just beginning to milk. As he learned to milk with the help of the cow, he also learned the art of living from the unforgiving reality of the Dust Bowl years tempered by the steadfast resilience of his Volga German community.

After he left the family's isolated Kansas farm and throughout his teaching career, Schmidtberger's life was filled with ever-present memories of family and community. Now he offers us those memories in stories told with wry humor and gentle grace. These tales span the decades with a clear-eyed gaze, reflecting a cultural legacy that laid the foundation for a life well-lived, and illustrating the deep cultural changes between America in the 1930s and the America we know today.  

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About the author

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Loren Schmidtberger born in 1928 and raised on a farm near Victoria, Kansas. He attended St. Fidelis Minor Seminary in Herman, Pennsylvania, before earning his BA from Fort Hays Kansas State University and his PhD from Fordham University.

Dr. Schmidtberger taught at Saint Peter’s University in New Jersey for fifty-one years, specializing in American literature, especially the works of William Faulkner. He was appointed the Will and Ariel Durant Professor of Humanities in 1991. He is currently Professor Emeritus of English at Saint Peter’s University. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Truman State University Press
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Published on
Nov 21, 2016
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Pages
328
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ISBN
9781612481692
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Sociology / Rural
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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