Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance

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The U.S. military’s concerns about the individual combat service member’s ability to avoid performance degradation, in conjunction with the need to maintain both mental and physical capabilities in highly stressful situations, have led to and interest in developing methods by which commanders can monitor the status of the combat service members in the field. This report examines appropriate biological markers, monitoring technologies currently available and in need of development, and appropriate algorithms to interpret the data obtained in order to provide information for command decisions relative to the physiological “readiness†of each combat service member. More specifically, this report also provides responses to questions posed by the military relative to monitoring the metabolic regulation during prolonged, exhaustive efforts, where nutrition/hydration and repair mechanisms may be mismatched to intakes and rest, or where specific metabolic derangements are present.
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Additional Information

Publisher
National Academies Press
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Published on
Jul 29, 2004
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Pages
468
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ISBN
9780309166119
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
Technology & Engineering / Military Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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