Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh

Penguin UK
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Queen - or, as she would prefer to be remembered King - Hatchepsut was an astonishing woman. Brilliantly defying tradition she became the female embodiment of a male role, dressing in men's clothes and even wearing a false beard. Forgotten until Egptologists deciphered hieroglyphics in the 1820's, she has since been subject to intense speculation about her actions and motivations. Combining archaeological and historical evidence from a wide range of sources, Joyce Tyldesley's dazzling piece of detection strips away the myths and misconceptions and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful place.
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About the author

Joyce Tyldesley lives in Bolton, Lancashire. She gained a first-class honours degree in archaeology from Liverpool University in 1981 and a doctorate from Oxford in 1986. She is now Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics andOriental Studies at Liverpool University and a freelance writer and lecturer on Egyptian archaeology. Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Egypt, is published by Penguin and her next book - a biography of Nefertiti - will be delivered in May 1997.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin UK
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Published on
Jan 29, 1998
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780141929347
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Royalty
History / Africa / General
History / Ancient / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Over the centuries the figure of the Queen of Sheba has loomed large in poetry and romance. The mysterious Queen, who is said to have visited Solomon in Jerusalem, has cast her spell over poets, painters and storytellers of many lands. The people of Ethiopia have always claimed her as her own, and to this day boast that her son Menelik ? fruit of the union between the Queen and Solomona? stole the Ark of the Covenant from the Temple in Jerusalem after Solomon's death. For all that, historians have been more sanguine, and increasingly over the past century the academic community has veered towards consigning both royal characters to the fairyland of myth and romance. In 1952, however, Immanuel Velikovsky made an astonishing claim: He announced that not only did the Queen of Sheba exist, but that she left numerous portraits of herself as well as an account of her famous journey to Israel. The Queen of Sheba, Velikovsky announced, was none other than Hatshepsut, the female ?pharaoh? of Egypt, who built a beautiful temple outside Thebes on the walls of which she immortalized the most important event of her life: an expedition to the Land of Punt. Punt, said Velikovsky, was one and the same as Israel. In this volume historian Emmet Scott brings forward dramatic new evidence in support of Velikovsky. He finds, among other things, that: - Ancient Israel, just like Punt, was a renowned source of frankincense.a - Egyptian documents, generally ignored in academic circles, unequivocally place Punt in the region of Syria/Palestine.a - The goddess Hathor was known as the ''Lady of Punt, '' but she was also known as the ''Lady of Byblos''. - The Egyptians claimed to be of Puntite origin, but Jewish and Phoenician legends claimed that the Egyptians came from their part of the world, and the Phoenicians named Misor - almost certainly the same as Osiris - as the Phoenician hero who founded the Nile Kingdom. This, and a wealth of additional evidence, has, Scott argues, shifted the burden of proof onto Velikovsky''s critics; and the identification of Hatshepsut with the Queen of Sheba will eventually compel the rewriting of all the history books. Joyce Tyldesley''s ''Hatchepsut'' deals with the same character, but from an entirely conventional viewpoint. She never even raises the possibility that the accepted chronology of Hatshepsut''s life may be wrong. In his ''Ages in Chaos, '' however, Immanuel Velikovsky did raise this possibility, and was the first to suggest that Hatshepsut be identified with the Queen of Sheba. Velikovsky''s work remains extremely popular, and the present book aims to take his ideas forward, exploring new evidence that has come to light since his death. This new evidence, Scott argues, puts the equation of Hatshepsut with the Queen of Sheba virtually beyond doubt."
The Ramesside period in Egypt (ca. 1290–1070 B.C.E.) corresponds to the late Bronze Age, a time of great change both in Egypt and the Near East. Viewed as an age of empire, dominated by the figure of Ramesses II, this period witnessed crucial developments in art, language, and religious display. Biographical Texts from Ramesside Egypt offers insights into these cultural transformations through the voices of thirty-one priests, artisans, civic officials, and governmental administrators who served under the kings of the nineteenth and twentieth dynasties. Forty-six biographical texts, which were inscribed in tombs, on statues and stelae in temples, and even on temple walls, give details of their careers and character. The translations are introduced by brief descriptions of the texts' monumental contexts and, where possible, summaries of the careers of their owners. They are formatted metrically and in stanzas to emphasize their poetic form and to foster a clearer understanding of them. The volume offers an introduction to the historical background of the Ramesside period and draws together some of the key themes and interpretive issues raised by the texts and their contexts. These include the representation of the people's relationships to god and king, the thematization of the priestly life, and the various transformations of the texts' media, including the implications of the change in the decorative programs of nonroyal tombs and the use of temple walls for some inscriptions. The introduction also locates the texts within broader contexts of biographical writing in Egypt and other societies, including our own.
Ambitious, intelligent, and desired by men and emperors, Cleopatra VII came to power at a time when Roman and Egyptian interests increasingly tended to concern the same object: the Egyptian Empire itself. Cleopatra lived her whole life at the center of this complex and persistent power struggle, and her death simultaneously heralded the end of the Ptolemaic dynasty, the loss of Egyptian political independence, and the beginning of Caesar Augustus's Roman rule in Egypt. Cleopatra's legacy has since lost much of its former political significance, as she has come to symbolize instead the potent force of female sexuality and power. In this engaging and multifaceted account, however, Stanley M. Burstein displays Cleopatra in the full manifold brilliance of the several cultures, countries, and people that surrounded her throughout her compelling life, and in so doing develops a stunning picture of a legendary Queen, and a deeply historic reign.

Designed as an accessible introduction to Cleopatra VII and her time, this book offers readers and researchers an appealing mix of descriptive chapters, biographical sketches, and annotated primary documents. An overview of the Ptolemaic Dynasty is presented in the introduction, and is followed by chapters on Cleopatra's life, the reality of Ptolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra's multicultural Egyptian society, and Alexandria's culture and conflicts. The narrative chapters conclude with a section discussing Cleopatra's significance as a person, a queen, and a symbol. An annotated bibliography and index are also included in this work.

One of the nation’s most respected Egyptologists examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen.

“Can the truth be known about a possible murder that would have been committed 3,000 years ago? Respected Egyptologist Bob Brier, specialist in paleopathology and host of the Learning Channel’s acclaimed series The Great Egyptians, believes it can. Skillfully combining known historical events with evidence gathered by advanced technologies, Brier has re-created the suspenseful story of religious upheaval and political intrigue that likely resulted in the murder of the teenage king Tutankhamen. . . . Breathing life into old bones and artifacts, Brier examines all available evidence to arrive at ‘the most reasonable explanation for a tragic event,’ an explanation that, he says, is testable through the use of current technology on the mummified remains of the ancient king.”—Booklist (starred review)

“Brier's 3,000-year-old mystery steadily draws the reader into the curious and exotic world of Egyptology. . . . By the time you finish his intrigue-filled reconstruction of Tutankhamen’s world—which includes such elements as teenage love, religious heresy,  the Orwellian rewriting of history and the desperate pleas of a terrified queen—you risk coming to care a good deal about the young Pharaoh’s fate. . . . We can be grateful to Dr. Brier for showing that even a mystery dating to the fourteenth century B.C. is subject to engrossing examination.”—The New York Times

INCLUDES 16 PAGES OF PHOTOS
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