Saudi Arabia: An Environmental Overview

CRC Press
Free sample

A comprehensive overview of Saudi Arabia’s environment, this volume is a unique and authoritative text on the geological and environmental aspects of Saudi Arabia, a country about which little is known by the outside world. Saudi Arabia is a fascinating country with a long tradition of environmental awareness and sensitivity, pitted against some of the harshest environments on earth. The book brings together a wide range of published and unpublished material which will be of interest to environmental scientists, geologists, geographers and biologists. A comprehensive bibliography is included. This book will be indispensable for university courses dealing with the Middle East and arid zone environments as well as various regional/environmental courses.
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About the author

Dr Peter Vincent has spent the last thirty years teaching Physical Geography at Lancaster University, UK. Since 1983 he has visited Saudi Arabia more or less on an annual basis and, in close collaboration with the Saudi Geological Survey, has visited all parts of the Kingdom. He has a particular interest in arid zone geomorphology.
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Additional Information

Publisher
CRC Press
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Published on
Jan 17, 2008
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Pages
332
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ISBN
9780203030882
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / General
Science / Earth Sciences / Geology
Social Science / Human Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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